U.S. Code of Federal Regulations

Regulations most recently checked for updates: May 28, 2020

§ 60.4213 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of greater than or equal to 30 liters per cylinder?

Owners and operators of stationary CI ICE with a displacement of greater than or equal to 30 liters per cylinder must conduct performance tests according to paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section.

(a) Each performance test must be conducted according to the requirements in § 60.8 and under the specific conditions that this subpart specifies in table 7. The test must be conducted within 10 percent of 100 percent peak (or the highest achievable) load.

(b) You may not conduct performance tests during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction, as specified in § 60.8(c).

(c) You must conduct three separate test runs for each performance test required in this section, as specified in § 60.8(f). Each test run must last at least 1 hour.

(d) To determine compliance with the percent reduction requirement, you must follow the requirements as specified in paragraphs (d)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) You must use Equation 2 of this section to determine compliance with the percent reduction requirement:

Where: Ci = concentration of NOX or PM at the control device inlet, Co = concentration of NOX or PM at the control device outlet, and R = percent reduction of NOX or PM emissions.

(2) You must normalize the NOX or PM concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the control device to a dry basis and to 15 percent oxygen (O2) using Equation 3 of this section, or an equivalent percent carbon dioxide (CO2) using the procedures described in paragraph (d)(3) of this section.

Where: Cadj = Calculated NOX or PM concentration adjusted to 15 percent O2. Cd = Measured concentration of NOX or PM, uncorrected. 5.9 = 20.9 percent O2−15 percent O2, the defined O2 correction value, percent. %O2 = Measured O2 concentration, dry basis, percent.

(3) If pollutant concentrations are to be corrected to 15 percent O2 and CO2 concentration is measured in lieu of O2 concentration measurement, a CO2 correction factor is needed. Calculate the CO2 correction factor as described in paragraphs (d)(3)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) Calculate the fuel-specific Fo value for the fuel burned during the test using values obtained from Method 19, Section 5.2, and the following equation:

Where: Fo = Fuel factor based on the ratio of O2 volume to the ultimate CO2 volume produced by the fuel at zero percent excess air. 0.209 = Fraction of air that is O2, percent/100. Fd = Ratio of the volume of dry effluent gas to the gross calorific value of the fuel from Method 19, dsm 3/J (dscf/10 6 Btu). Fc = Ratio of the volume of CO2 produced to the gross calorific value of the fuel from Method 19, dsm 3/J (dscf/10 6 Btu).

(ii) Calculate the CO2 correction factor for correcting measurement data to 15 percent O2, as follows:

Where: XCO2 = CO2 correction factor, percent. 5.9 = 20.9 percent O2−15 percent O2, the defined O2 correction value, percent.

(iii) Calculate the NOX and PM gas concentrations adjusted to 15 percent O2 using CO2 as follows:

Where: Cadj = Calculated NOX or PM concentration adjusted to 15 percent O2. Cd = Measured concentration of NOX or PM, uncorrected. %CO2 = Measured CO2 concentration, dry basis, percent.

(e) To determine compliance with the NOX mass per unit output emission limitation, convert the concentration of NOX in the engine exhaust using Equation 7 of this section:

Where: ER = Emission rate in grams per KW-hour. Cd = Measured NOX concentration in ppm. 1.912x10−3 = Conversion constant for ppm NOX to grams per standard cubic meter at 25 degrees Celsius. Q = Stack gas volumetric flow rate, in standard cubic meter per hour. T = Time of test run, in hours. KW-hour = Brake work of the engine, in KW-hour.

(f) To determine compliance with the PM mass per unit output emission limitation, convert the concentration of PM in the engine exhaust using Equation 8 of this section:

Where: ER = Emission rate in grams per KW-hour. Cadj = Calculated PM concentration in grams per standard cubic meter. Q = Stack gas volumetric flow rate, in standard cubic meter per hour. T = Time of test run, in hours. KW-hour = Energy output of the engine, in KW. [71 FR 39172, July 11, 2006, as amended at 76 FR 37971, June 28, 2011]