Collapse to view only § 391b-1. Laws applicable to added lands

§ 391. Establishment; boundaries

The tracts of land on the island of Hawaii and on the island of Maui, in the Territory of Hawaii, hereinafter described, shall be perpetually dedicated and set apart as a public park or pleasure ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the United States, to be known as Hawaii National Park. Said tracts of land are described as follows:

First. All that tract of land comprising portion of the lands of Kapapala and Keauhou, in the District of Kau, and portions of the lands of Keaau, Kahaualea, Panaunui, and Apua, in the District of Puna, containing approximately thirty-four thousand five hundred and thirty-one acres, bounded as follows:

Beginning at a point on the west edge of the Keamoku Aa Flow (lava flow of 1823), the coordinates of said point of beginning referred to Government Survey Trigonometry Station “Uwekahuna”, being four thousand seven hundred and six and six-tenths feet south and seventeen thousand nine hundred and seventy and three-tenths feet west, and the true azimuth and distance from said point of beginning to Government Survey Trigonometry Station “Ohaikea”, being one hundred and sixty-six degrees and twenty minutes, six thousand three hundr

(Aug. 1, 1916, ch. 264, § 1, 39 Stat. 432; May 1, 1922, ch. 174, 42 Stat. 503; Apr. 11, 1928, ch. 359, § 1, 45 Stat. 424.)
§ 391a. Boundary on island of Maui changed

The boundary of the Hawaii National Park on the island of Maui is changed to read as follows:

Beginning at a triangle on set stone, said mark being the Government survey triangulation station Puu Nianiau in the land of Kalialinui, and running by true azimuths:

1. Three hundred degress fifty-seven minutes thirty seconds eleven thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine and three-tenths feet along the remaining portion of the land of Kalialinui to a concrete monument marked Number 1 on spur and on the west edge of Koolau Gap.

2. Two hundred and ninety-seven degrees forty-seven minutes thirty seconds fourteen thousand six hundred and fifty-two and six-tenths feet along same and across Koolau Gap to a concrete monument marked Number 3, the true azimuth and distance from said monument to Government survey triangulation station Hanakauhi being forty-five degrees fourteen minutes nine hundred and eighty-eight feet.

3. Two hundred and sixty-nine degrees fifty-seven minutes thirty seconds nine thousand and one and three-tenths feet along same to a concrete monument marked Number 7 on the southwest boundary of the land of Haiku.

4. Three hundred and six degrees thirty-nine minutes three thousand nine hundred and thirteen and four-tenths feet along the southwest boundary of the land of Haiku to a cross on large flat rock called Pohaku Palaha.

5. Two hundred and seventy-three degrees seven minutes four hundred and forty feet along the Nahiku tract to Government survey triangulation station Pakihi.

6. Thence following along summit of dividing ridge between Haleakala crater and Kipahulu Valley to an ahu at a place called Pakihi, the direct azimuth and distance being three hundred and fifty degrees four minutes thirty seconds seven thousand four hundred and fourteen and seven-tenths feet.

7. Thence along Government land and following along rim of the crater and crest of wall of Kaupo Gap to a four inch by four inch redwood post, the direct azimuth and distance being three hundred and fifty-six degrees forty-one minutes ten thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven and nine-tenths feet.

8. Eighty-six degrees one minute thirty seconds six thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven and four-tenths feet along grant 3457, lot 1, to A. V. Marciel, and the remaining portion of the land of Nuu (R. P. 8049, L. C. A. 6239 Apana 2 to Kalaimoku), passing over a cross on stone at Kauhaokamoa at three thousand four hundred and forty-one and eight-tenths feet and passing over an iron pipe on the west edge of the Koolau Gap at five thousand eight hundred and seventy-four feet.

9. One hundred and thirty-eight degrees forty-two minutes thirty seconds nine thousand five hundred and seventy-four and two-tenths feet along the remaining portion of said land of Nuu to a cross on rock, the true azimuth and distance to Government survey triangulation station Haleakala 2 being one hundred and seventy-nine degrees thirteen minutes fifteen seconds nine hundred and forty-three and two-tenths feet.

10. Ninety-one degrees thirty-four minutes forty-five seconds nine thousand nine hundred and sixty and four-tenths feet along same to a concrete monument marked Number 14, the true azimuth and distance from said monument to an arrow on rock called Kumuiliahi, marking the northeast corner of the land of Nakula, being one hundred and sixty-seven degrees twenty-eight minutes nine hundred and twenty-eight and seven-tenths feet.

11. Ninety degrees twenty-three minutes thirty seconds twelve thousand two hundred and forty-nine and three-tenths feet along the remaining portion of the lands of Nakula and Kahikinui to a concrete monument marked Number 15.

12. One hundred and seventeen degrees fifty-two minutes thirty seconds five thousand two hundred and nine and two-tenths feet along the remaining portion of the land of Kahikinui to a concrete monument marked Number 16, the true azimuth and distance from said monument to Government survey triangulation station Kolekole, being ninety-eight degrees thirty minutes one thousand five hundred and forty-three and five-tenths feet.

13. One hundred and twenty-seven degrees thirty-eight minutes two thousand one hundred and seventy-five and six-tenths feet along same and the land of Papaanui to a concrete monument marked Number 17, the true azimuth and distance from said monument to a concrete monument marked Number 25, which marks the south corner of the land of Kealahou 3 and 4 being forty degrees ten minutes thirty seconds four hundred and sixty-six and two-tenths feet.

14. Two hundred and thirteen degrees forty-six minutes eight thousand two hundred and forty-one and two-tenths feet along the remaining portions of the lands of Kealahou 3 and 4 and Pulehunui to a concrete monument marked Number 19, the true azimuth and distance from said monument to a “K” marked on a large lava rock called Kilohana, at the east corner of the lands of Kealahou 3 and 4, being three hundred and twenty-three degrees fifty-three minutes nine hundred and forty-seven and three-tenths feet.

15. One hundred and forty-three degrees fifty-three minutes six thousand nine hundred and five and three-tenths feet along the land of Pulehunui to a concrete monument marked Number 20.

16. One hundred and ninety-nine degrees twenty-three minutes ten thousand seven hundred and twenty-six feet along the remaining portion of the land of Kalialinui to the point of beginning, passing over a concrete monument marked Number 22 at a distance of six thousand four hundred thirty-six and seven-tenths feet; including portions of the lands of Kealahou 3 and 4, Pulehunui, Kalialinui, Kaupo, Nuu, Nakula, Kahikinui and Papaanui, Island of Maui, and containing seventeen thousand one hundred and thirty acres, more or less; and all of those lands lying within the boundary above described are included in and made a part of the Hawaii National Park subject to all laws and regulations pertaining to said park.

(Feb. 12, 1927, ch. 111, § 1, 44 Stat. 1087.)
§ 391b. Extension of boundaries

When title to all or any of the following-described lands on the island of Hawaii, in the Territory of Hawaii, shall be vested in the United States, such lands shall be, and the same are, added to and made a part of the Hawaii National Park:

Kalapana extension (being portions of the lands of Kahaualea, Panaunui, and Apua and all of the lands of Poupou, Pulama, Kamoamoa, Laeapuki, Panauiki, Kealakomo, and Kahue, in the district of Puna, and portion of the land of Keauhou, in the district of Kau): Beginning at the United States National Ocean Survey triangulation station Kupapau (marked by a survey tablet set in large rock), the true azimuth and distance from said point of beginning to the United States National Ocean Survey triangulation station Hakuma (marked by a United States National Ocean Survey tablet set in smooth lava outcrop and surrounded by a circular patch of cement near edge of sea pali) being two hundred and forty-four degrees forty minutes and fifty seconds exactly fourteen thousand four hundred and thirteen feet and running as follows, all azimuths being measured clockwise from true south (note azimuths of courses 1 to 4, inclusive, are referred to Hakuma meridian):

Along the seacoast at high-water mark, in a general southwesterly direction for the first five courses, the true azimuths and distances between points on said seacoast being—

1. Exactly sixty-six degrees and fifteen minutes twenty-six thousand three hundred and thirty-six and six-tenths feet to United States National Ocean Survey station Laeapuki, marked by a survey tablet set in mound and covered by a small cairn;

2. Exactly sixty degrees and ten minutes eighteen thousand seven hundred feet to Kaena Point;

3. Exactly seventy-one degrees and fifty-six minutes, twenty-one thousand three hundred and fifty feet to Apua Point;

4. Exactly ninety-eight degrees and forty-five minutes seven thousand four hundred feet to a pipe in concrete at a place called Okiokiahu (note: azimuths of courses 5 to 11, inclusive, are referred to Uwekahuna meridian);

5. One hundred and nine degrees fifty-seven minutes and twenty-two seconds ten thousand seven hundred and seventeen and nine-tenths feet to a pipe in concrete at a place called Makaloa; thence

6. One hundred and seventy degrees four minutes and thirty-nine seconds exactly six thousand eight hundred feet along Hawaii National Park, Kilauea section, to the foot of the Puueo pali;

7. Two hundred and forty-three degrees five minutes and thirty seconds exactly one thousand nine hundred and seventy-three feet along the foot of Puueo pali along portion of the land of Keauhou;

8. Exactly two hundred and eighty-six degrees fifty minutes exactly nine thousand seven hundred feet along portion of the land of Keauhou;

9. One hundred and seventy-eight degrees thirty-eight minutes and twenty-five seconds exactly twelve thousand five hundred feet along portion of the land of Keauhou to a pipe in concrete at top of the Poliokeawe pali;

10. One hundred and sixty-six degrees twenty-two minutes and twenty-four seconds twelve thousand four hundred and sixty-seven and nine-tenths feet along portion of the land of Keauhou to a pipe in concrete on the south boundary of Hawaii National Park, Kilauea section;

11. Exactly two hundred and sixty-nine degrees and ten minutes twenty-one thousand one hundred forty-six and five-tenths feet along Hawaii National Park, Kilauea section, to a pipe (note: azimuths of courses 12 and 13 are referred to Puu Huluhulu meridian):

12. Exactly two hundred and eleven degrees and thirty minutes thirteen thousand seventy-four and seven-tenths feet along Hawaii National Park, Kilauea section, to a pipe;

13. Exactly two hundred and eighty-one degrees exactly two thousand nine hundred and thirty-one feet along portion of the land of Kahaualea (note: azimuths of courses 14 to 24, inclusive, are referred to Hakuma meridian);

14. Exactly two hundred and twelve degrees and thirty minutes exactly eight thousand and fifteen feet along the land of Kahaualea;

15. Exactly two hundred and ninety-seven degrees and fifteen minutes exactly twenty-four thousand five hundred and fifty-two feet along the land of Kahaualea;

16. Exactly two hundred and forty-five degrees and fifty-eight minutes exactly six thousand one hundred and sixty-eight feet along the land of Kahaualea;

17. Exactly three hundred and twenty-six degrees and thirty-one minutes exactly five thousand two hundred and forty-eight feet along the land of Kahaualea;

18. Exactly three hundred and fifty-nine degrees and fifteen minutes exactly four hundred and forty-five feet along the land of Kahaualea;

19. Exactly three hundred and twenty-nine degrees exactly two thousand two hundred and eleven feet along the land of Kahaualea;

20. Two hundred and thirty-four degrees thirty-nine minutes and forty seconds exactly three thousand two hundred and eighty-three feet across portion of the land of Kahaualea;

21. Exactly three hundred and thirty-eight degrees and twelve minutes three thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven and five-tenths feet along the land of Kapaahu;

(June 20, 1938, ch. 530, § 1, 52 Stat. 781; Pub. L. 105–380, § 2, Nov. 12, 1998, 112 Stat. 3401; Pub. L. 106–510, § 2, Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2363.)
§ 391b–1. Laws applicable to added lands

The provisions of the Act of August 1, 1916 (39 Stat. 432), entitled “An Act to establish a national park in the Territory of Hawaii”; the Act of August 25, 1916 (39 Stat. 535), entitled “An Act to establish a National Park Service, and for other purposes”; 1

1 See References in Text note below.
the Act of February 27, 1920 (41 Stat. 452), entitled “An Act to authorize the Governor of the Territory of Hawaii to acquire privately owned lands and rights-of-way within the boundaries of the Hawaii National Park”; and all Acts supplementary to and amendatory of said Acts are made applicable to and extended over the lands hereby added to the park: Provided, That the provisions of the Federal Power Act [16 U.S.C. 791a et seq.] shall not apply to or extend over such lands.

(June 20, 1938, ch. 530, § 4, 52 Stat. 785.)
§ 391c. Withdrawal of lands for use as bombing target range

Within a tract of land containing six thousand four hundred fifty acres, more or less, on the island of Hawaii in the Territory of Hawaii, located in the Hawaii National Park, created by sections 391, 393 and 394 of this title, and described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at a place called Na Puu O na Elemakule located at the southeastern corner of the Hawaii National Park, said point being marked by a triangle on a large flat stone, thence by azimuth (measured clockwise from true south) and distances as follows: Eighty-nine degrees twenty-seven minutes thirty seconds, three thousand three hundred feet along the southern boundary of Hawaii National Park; one hundred and seventy-nine degrees twenty-seven minutes thirty seconds, fourteen thousand five hundred and fifty feet over and across Pali to a point on Kau Desert Plateau; two hundred and forty-three degrees fifty-seven minutes no seconds, eighteen thousand four hundred and fifty feet to a point located above Hilima Pali; three hundred and fifty-nine degrees twenty-seven minutes thirty seconds, twelve thousand nine-hundred and ninety feet more or less to high-water line; thence in southwesterly direction along the high-water line to the point of beginning; containing an area of six thousand four hundred and fifty acres, more or less; there shall be withdrawn from the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior and transferred to the jurisdiction and control of the Secretary of the Air Force so much thereof as may be agreed upon between the Secretaries of the Air Force and Interior for use as an Air Force bombing target range, and for such other military purposes and uses as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Air Force.

(July 16, 1940, ch. 630, 54 Stat. 761; July 26, 1947, ch. 343, title II, § 207(a), (f), 61 Stat. 502, 503.)
§ 391d. Change in name of part of Hawaii National Park

Effective September 22, 1961, the portion of the Hawaii National Park situated on the island of Hawaii, established and administered pursuant to sections 391, 393, and 394 of this title, as amended and supplemented, shall be known as the Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.

(Pub. L. 87–278, Sept. 22, 1961, 75 Stat. 577; Pub. L. 106–510, § 3(a)(1), Nov. 13, 2000, 114 Stat. 2363.)
§ 392. Acquisition of privately owned lands

The governor of the Territory of Hawaii is authorized to acquire, at the expense of the Territory of Hawaii, by exchange or otherwise, all privately owned lands lying within the boundaries of the Hawaii National Park as defined by section 391 of this title, and all necessary perpetual easements and rights-of-way, or roadways, in fee simple, over or to said land or any part thereof, but the provisions of section 73 of an Act entitled “An Act to provide a government for the Territory of Hawaii,” approved April 30, 1900, as amended by an Act approved May 27, 1910, relating to exchanges of public lands shall not apply in the acquisition, by exchange, of the privately owned lands herein referred to.

(Feb. 27, 1920, ch. 89, §§ 1, 2, 41 Stat. 452, 453.)
§ 392a. Provisions of section 392 extended to additional lands

The provisions of section 392 of this title are extended over and made applicable to the lands added to the park and included within the boundary established by section 391a of this title.

(Feb. 12, 1927, ch. 111, § 2, 44 Stat. 1089.)
§ 392b. Conveyance of added lands to United States by Governor

The Governor of the Territory of Hawaii is authorized to convey to the United States any and all lands and interests in lands acquired by the Territorial Government under the provisions of sections 391b, 391b–1, 392c, 396, 396a of this title.

(June 20, 1938, ch. 530, § 4, 52 Stat. 785.)
§ 392c. Addition to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
(a) Acquisition of land

Notwithstanding any other provision of sections 391b, 391b–1, 392b, 396, and 396a of this title, the Secretary of the Interior (hereinafter referred to as the “Secretary”) is authorized to acquire by donation or exchange the land and interests therein comprising approximately 5,650 acres and identified as tract number 118/22 on the map entitled “Recommended Land Acquisition”, in the Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Land Protection Plan as recommended May 17, 1985, which plan shall be on file and available for public inspection in the Office of the Director, National Park Service, Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. and the Office of the Superintendent, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii.

(b) Exchange of land; equalization payments

In exercising his authority to acquire the real property referred to in subsection (a) by exchange, the Secretary may accept title thereto and in exchange therefor he may convey to the grantor of such real property title to any United States Government real property under his administrative jurisdiction, other than real property within or administered as a part of the National Park System, in the State of Hawaii which he determines is suitable for such exchange. The values of the properties exchanged shall be approximately equal, or if they are not approximately equal, the values shall be equalized by the payment of money to the grantor or to the Secretary as the circumstances require. In no circumstance shall an equalization payment exceed one fourth (25 percent) the appraised value of the real property referred to in subsection (a). Any money paid to the Secretary shall be deposited as miscellaneous receipts in the Treasury of the United States.

(c) State owned land; acquisition only by donation or exchange

Real property owned by the State of Hawaii or any political subdivision thereof may be acquired only by donation or exchange.

(d) Transfer of administrative jurisdiction over surplus federally owned real property in Hawaii to facilitate exchange; exchange of land with State of Hawaii, consultation, limitation
(1) In order to facilitate the acquisition of the real property referred to in subsection (a) by exchange, notwithstanding any other provision of law, upon request of the Secretary, the Administrator of General Services shall transfer to the Secretary, without reimbursement, administrative jurisdiction over any excess or surplus United States Government real property in the State of Hawaii for purposes of such an exchange.
(2) For the purposes of a land exchange with the State of Hawaii, the Secretary shall consult with the State of Hawaii in the process of identifying suitable exchange lands belonging to the United States Government.
(3) For the purposes of a land exchange with the State of Hawaii, real property owned by the United States Government and selected for use in a land exchange shall not be from among those lands ceded to the United States Government.
(e) Administration of land acquired

The real property acquired by the Secretary pursuant to this section shall be administered by the Secretary as part of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, subject to the laws and regulations applicable to the Park.

(f) Authorization of appropriations

There is hereby authorized to be appropriated up to $700,000 to carry out the purpose of this section.

(June 20, 1938, ch. 530, § 5, as added Pub. L. 99–564, § 1, Oct. 27, 1986, 100 Stat. 3179; amended Pub. L. 108–352, § 3, Oct. 21, 2004, 118 Stat. 1395.)
§ 393. Entries under land laws; rights-of-way; lands excluded

Nothing herein contained shall affect any valid claim, location, or entry existing under the land laws of the United States prior to August 1, 1916, whether for homestead, mineral, right-of-way, or any other purpose whatsoever, or shall affect the rights of any such claimant, locator, or entryman to the full use and enjoyment of his land. Whenever consistent with the primary purposes of the park the Act of February fifteenth, nineteen hundred and one,1

1 See References in Text note below.
applicable to the location of rights of way in certain national parks and the national forests for irrigation and other purposes, shall be and remain applicable to the lands included within the park. The Secretary of the Interior may, in his discretion and upon such conditions as he may deem wise, grant easements or rights-of-way for steam, electric, or similar transportation upon or across the park. No lands located within the park boundaries held in private or municipal ownership prior to August 1, 1916, shall be affected by or subject to the provisions of this section and sections 391 and 394 of this title.

(Aug. 1, 1916, ch. 264, §§ 2, 3, 39 Stat. 433, 434.)
§ 394. Control; rules and regulations; leases; appropriations

Hawaii National Park shall be under the executive control of the Secretary of the Interior whose duty it shall be, as soon as practicable, to make and publish such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary or proper for the care and management of the same. Such regulations shall provide for the preservation from injury of all timber, birds, mineral deposits, and natural curiosities or wonders within said park, and their retention in their natural condition as nearly as possible. The Secretary may in his discretion grant leases for terms not exceeding twenty years, at such annual rental as he may determine, of parcels of land in said park of not more than twenty acres in all to any one person, corporation, or company for the erection and maintenance of buildings for the accommodation of visitors; but no such lease shall include any of the objects of curiosity or interest in said park or exclude the public from free and convenient approach thereto or convey, either expressly or by implication, any exclusive privilege within the park except upon the premises held thereunder and for the time granted therein; and every such lease shall require the lessee to observe and obey each and every provision in any Act of Congress and every rule, order, or regulation of the Secretary of the Interior concerning the use, care, management, or government of the park, or any object or property therein, under penalty of forfeiture of such lease. The Secretary may in his discretion grant to persons or corporations now holding leases of land in the park, upon the surrender thereof, new leases hereunder, upon the terms and stipulations contained in their present leases, with such modifications, restrictions, and reservations as he may prescribe. All of the proceeds of said leases and other revenues that may be derived from any source connected with the park shall be expended under the direction of the Secretary, in the management and protection of the same and the construction of roads and paths therein. The Secretary may also, in his discretion, permit the erection and maintenance of buildings in said park for scientific purposes: And provided further,1

1 So in original. The previous proviso was struck out by an amendment.
That no appropriation shall be made for the improvement or maintenance of said park until proper conveyances shall be made to the United States of such perpetual easements and rights of way over private lands within the exterior boundaries of said park as the Secretary of the Interior shall find necessary to make said park reasonably accessible in all its parts, and said Secretary shall when such easements and rights of way have been conveyed to the United States report the same to Congress.

(Aug. 1, 1916, ch. 264, § 4, 39 Stat. 434; June 5, 1924, ch. 263, 43 Stat. 390.)
§ 395. Exclusive jurisdiction in United States; exceptions; laws applicable; fugitives from justice

Sole and exclusive jurisdiction shall be exercised by the United States over the territory which is now or may hereafter be included in the Hawaii National Park in the Territory of Hawaii, saving, however, to the Territory of Hawaii the right to serve civil or criminal process within the limits of the aforesaid park in suits or prosecutions for or on account of rights acquired, obligations incurred, or crimes committed outside of said park, and saving further to the Territory of Hawaii the right to tax persons and corporations, their franchises and property on the lands included in said park. All the laws applicable to places under the sole and exclusive jurisdiction of the United States shall have force and effect in said park. All fugitives from justice taking refuge in said park shall be subject to the same laws as refugees from justice found in the Territory of Hawaii.

(Apr. 19, 1930, ch. 200, § 1, 46 Stat. 227.)
§§ 395a, 395b. Repealed. June 25, 1948, ch. 646, § 39, 62 Stat. 992, eff. Sept. 1, 1948
§ 395c. Hunting and fishing; general rules and regulations; protection of property; violation of statutes and rules; penalties

All hunting or the killing, wounding, or capturing at any time of any wild bird or animal, except dangerous animals when it is necessary to prevent them from destroying human lives or inflicting personal injury, is prohibited within the limits of said park; nor shall any fish be taken out of the waters of the park in any other way than by hook and line, and then only at such seasons and in such times and manner as may be directed by the Secretary of the Interior. That the Secretary of the Interior shall make and publish such general rules and regulations as he may deem necessary and proper for the management and care of the park and for the protection of the property therein, especially for the preservation from injury or spoliation of all timber, natural curiosities, or wonderful objects within said park, and for the protection of the animals and birds in the park from capture or destruction, and to prevent their being frightened or driven from the park; and he shall make rules and regulations governing the taking of fish from the streams or lakes in the park. Possession within said park of the dead bodies, or any part thereof, of any wild bird or animal shall be prima facie evidence that the person or persons having the same are guilty of violating this Act. Any person or persons, or stage or express company, or railway company, who knows or has reason to believe that they were taken or killed contrary to the provisions of this Act and who receives for transportation any of said animals, birds, or fish so killed, caught, or taken, or who shall violate any of the provisions of this Act or any rule or regulation that may be promulgated by the Secretary of the Interior with reference to the management and care of the park or for the protection of the property therein, for the preservation from injury or spoliation of timber, natural curiosities, or wonderful objects within said park, or for the protection of the animals, birds, or fish in the park, or who shall within said park willfully commit any damage, injury, or spoliation to or upon any building, fence, hedge, gate, guidepost, tree, wood, underwood, timber, garden, crops, vegetables, plants, land, springs, natural curiosities, or other matter or thing growing or being thereon or situated therein, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be subject to a fine of not more than $500 or imprisonment not exceeding six months, or both, and be adjudged to pay all costs of the proceedings.

(Apr. 19, 1930, ch. 200, § 4, 46 Stat. 227.)
§ 395d. Forfeiture of property used for unlawful purposes

All guns, traps, teams, horses, or means of transportation of every nature or description used by any person or persons within said park limits when engaged in killing, trapping, ensnaring, or capturing such wild beasts, birds, or animals shall be forfeited to the United States and may be seized by the officers in said park and held pending the prosecution of any person or persons arrested under charge of violating the provisions of this Act, and upon conviction under this Act of such person or persons using said guns, traps, teams, horses, or other means of transportation, such forfeiture shall be adjudicated as a penalty in addition to the other punishment provided in this Act. Such forfeited property shall be disposed of and accounted for by and under the authority of the Secretary of the Interior.

(Apr. 19, 1930, ch. 200, § 5, 46 Stat. 228.)
§§ 395e to 395j. Repealed. June 25, 1948, ch. 646, § 39, 62 Stat. 992, eff. Sept. 1, 1948
§ 396. Additional lands; acceptance of title

The Secretary of the Interior is authorized, in his discretion and upon submission of evidence of satisfactory title to him, to accept, on behalf of the United States, title to the lands referred to in section 391b of this title as may be deemed by him necessary or desirable for national-park purposes.

(June 20, 1938, ch. 530, § 2, 52 Stat. 784.)
§ 396a. Lease of lands to native Hawaiians, residence requirements; fishing
(a) The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to lease, under such rules and regulations as he may deem proper, land ascertained by him to be suitable for home site purposes in the Kalapana extension as described in section 391b of this title, to native Hawaiians when such occupancy does not encroach on or prevent free access to any points of historic, scientific, or scenic interest or in any manner obstruct or interfere with protection and preservation of said area as a part of the Hawaii National Park: Provided, however, That occupants of homesites shall reside on the land not less than six months in any one year: And provided further, That fishing shall be permitted in said area only by native Hawaiian residents of said area or of adjacent villages and by visitors under their guidance.
(b) The term “native Hawaiian”, as used in this section, means any descendant of not less than one-half part of the blood of the races inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands previous to 1778.
(June 20, 1938, ch. 530, § 3, 52 Stat. 784.)