Collapse to view only § 1356. Termination of payments into Philippine treasury

§§ 1351 to 1353.
Omitted
§ 1354.
Quotas on Philippine articles
(a)
to (c) Omitted
(d)
Investigations by International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission shall at the request of the President, upon resolution of either House of Congress or concurrent resolution of both Houses of Congress, upon its own motion, or when in its judgment there is good reason therefor, upon application of any interested party, make an investigation to ascertain (1) whether imports of a Philippine article (other than an article for which a quota is established by part 2 of subchapter I) are coming, or are likely to come, into substantial competition with like articles which are the product of the United States; (2) what is the greatest amount of such article which may be entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, in the United States for consumption, without coming into substantial competition with like articles which are the product of the United States; and (3) the total amount of such article which (during the twelve months ended on the last day of the month preceding the month in which occurs the date of the beginning of the investigation) was entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, in the United States for consumption. During the course of the investigation the Commission shall hold a public hearing, of which reasonable public notice shall be given and at which parties interested shall be afforded reasonable opportunity to be present, to produce evidence, and to be heard. The Commission shall give precedence to such investigations. The Commission shall report the results of its investigations to the President, and shall send copies of such report to each House of the Congress.

(Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, § 504, 60 Stat. 156; Pub. L. 93–618, title I, § 171(b), Jan. 3, 1975, 88 Stat. 2009.)
§ 1355.
Suspension of processing tax on coconut oil

Whenever the President, after consultation with the President of the Philippines, finds that adequate supplies of neither copra nor coconut oil, the product of the Philippines, are readily available for processing in the United States, he shall so proclaim, and after the date of such proclamation the provisions of section 2470(a)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code shall be suspended until the expiration of 30 days after he proclaims that, after consultation with the President of the Philippines, he has found that such adequate supplies are so readily available.

(Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, § 505(b), 60 Stat. 157.)
§ 1356.
Termination of payments into Philippine treasury

Notwithstanding the provisions of section 4 of the Act of March 8, 1902 (32 Stat. 54, ch. 140), or of section 19 of the Act of March 24, 1934 (48 Stat. 456, ch. 84), as added to such Act by section 6 of the Act of August 7, 1939 (53 Stat. 1232, ch. 502), or of the Act of November 8, 1945 (59 Stat. 577, ch. 454) or of any other provision of law, the proceeds of any duties or taxes, collected subsequent to July 3, 1946, which but for the enactment of this Act would be required to be paid into the general funds of the Treasury of the Philippines or would be held in separate or special funds and paid into the Treasury of the Philippines, shall be covered into the general fund of the Treasury of the United States.

(Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, § 506(a), 60 Stat. 157.)
§ 1357.
Trade agreements with the Philippines

Until July 4, 1974, no trade agreement shall be made with the Philippines under section 1351 of title 19, unless, prior to such time, the President of the United States has made the proclamation provided for in section 1347 of this title, or the executive agreement provided for in subchapter III of this chapter has been terminated.

(Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, § 508, 60 Stat. 158.)
§ 1358.
Rights of third countries

The benefits granted by subchapters I to IV of this chapter, and by the executive agreement provided for in subchapter III, to the Philippines, Philippine articles or products, and Philippine citizens, shall not, by reason of any provision of any existing treaty or agreement with any third country, be extended to such country or its products, citizens, or subjects.

(Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, § 509, 60 Stat. 158.)
§ 1359.
Omitted
§ 1360.
Definitions
(a)
For the purposes of subchapters I to IV of this chapter—
(1) The term “person” includes partnerships, corporations, and associations.
(2) The term “United States”, when used in a geographical sense, means the States, the District of Columbia, the Territories of Alaska and Hawaii, and Puerto Rico.
(3)
The term “ordinary customs duty” means a customs duty based on the article as such (whether or not such duty is also based in any manner on the use, value, or method of production of the article, or on the amount of like articles imported, or on any other factor); but does not include—
(A) a customs duty based on an act or omission of any person with respect to the importation of the article, or of the country from which the article is exported, or from which it comes; or
(B) a countervailing duty imposed to offset a subsidy, bounty, or grant; or
(C) an anti-dumping duty imposed to offset the selling of merchandise for exportation at a price less than the prevailing price in the country of export; or
(D) any tax, fee, charge, or exaction, imposed on or in connection with importation unless the law of the country imposing it designates or imposes it as a customs duty or contains a provision to the effect that it shall be treated as a duty imposed under the customs laws; or
(E) the tax imposed by section 2491(c) of the Internal Revenue Code with respect to an article, merchandise, or combination, 10 per centum or more of the quantity by weight of which consists of, or is derived directly or indirectly from, one or more of the oils, fatty acids, or salts specified in section 2470 of the Internal Revenue Code; or the tax imposed by section 3500 of the Internal Revenue Code.
(4) The term “Philippine article” means an article which is the product of the Philippines, unless, in the case of an article produced with the use of materials imported into the Philippines from any foreign country (except the United States) the aggregate value of such imported materials at the time of importation into the Philippines was more than twenty per centum of the value of the article imported into the United States, the value of such article to be determined in accordance with, and as of the time provided by, the customs laws of the United States in effect at the time of importation of such article. As used in this paragraph the term “value”, when used in reference to a material imported into the Philippines, includes the value of the material ascertained under the customs laws of the Philippines in effect at the time of importation into the Philippines, and, if not included in such value, the cost of bringing the material to the Philippines, but does not include the cost of landing it at the port of importation, or customs duties collected in the Philippines. For the purposes of this paragraph any imported material, used in the production of an article in the Philippines, shall be considered as having been used in the production of an article subsequently produced in the Philippines, which is the product of a chain of production in the Philippines in the course of which an article, which is the product of one stage of the chain, is used by its producer or another person, in a subsequent stage of the chain, as a material in the production of another article.
(5) The term “United States article” means an article which is the product of the United States, unless, in the case of an article produced with the use of materials imported into the United States from any foreign country (except the Philippines) the aggregate value of such imported materials at the time of importation into the United States was more than twenty per centum of the value of the article imported into the Philippines, the value of such article to be determined in accordance with, and as of the time provided by, the customs laws of the Philippines in effect at the time of importation of such article. As used in this paragraph the term “value”, when used in reference to a material imported into the United States, includes the value of the material ascertained under the customs laws of the United States in effect at the time of importation into the United States, and, if not included in such value, the cost of bringing the material to the United States, but does not include the cost of landing it at the port of importation, or customs duties collected in the United States. For the purposes of this paragraph any imported material, used in the production of an article in the United States, shall be considered as having been used in the production of an article subsequently produced in the United States, which is the product of a chain of production in the United States in the course of which an article, which is the product of one stage of the chain, is used by its producer or another person, in a subsequent stage of the chain, as a material in the production of another article.
(6) The term “United States duty” means the rate or rates of ordinary customs duty which (at the time and place of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, in the United States for consumption, of the Philippine article) would be applicable to a like article if imported from that foreign country which is entitled to the lowest rate, or the lowest aggregate of rates, of ordinary customs duty with respect to such like article.
(7) The term “Philippine duty” means the rate or rates of ordinary customs duty which (at the time and place of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, in the Philippines for consumption, of the United States article) would be applicable to a like article if imported from that foreign country which is entitled to the lowest rate, or the lowest aggregate of rates, of ordinary customs duty with respect to such like article.
(8)
The term “internal tax” includes an internal fee, charge, or exaction, and includes—
(A) the tax imposed by section 2491(c) of the Internal Revenue Code with respect to an article, merchandise, or combination, 10 per centum or more of the quantity by weight of which consists of, or is derived directly or indirectly from, one or more of the oils, fatty acids, or salts specified in section 2470 of the Internal Revenue Code; and the tax imposed by section 3500 of the Internal Revenue Code; and
(B) any other tax, fee, charge, or exaction, imposed on or in connection with importation unless the law of the country imposing it designates or imposes it as a customs duty or contains a provision to the effect that it shall be treated as a duty imposed under the customs laws.
(b) For the purposes of sections 1271(b) and 1311(b) of this title, any material, used in the production of an article, shall be considered as having been used in the production of an article subsequently produced, which is the product of a chain of production in the course of which an article, which is the product of one stage of the chain, is used by its producer or another person, in a subsequent stage of the chain, as a material in the production of another article.
(c)
For the purposes of paragraphs (6) and (7) of subsection (a) of this section—
(1) if an article is entitled to be imported from a foreign country free of ordinary customs duty, that country shall be considered as the country entitled to the lowest rate of ordinary customs duty with respect to such article; and
(2) a reduction in ordinary customs duty granted any country, by law, treaty, trade agreement, or otherwise, with respect to any article, shall be converted into the equivalent reduction in the rate of ordinary customs duty otherwise applicable to such article.
(d) The terms “includes” and “including” when used in a definition contained in subchapters I to IV of this chapter shall not be deemed to exclude other things otherwise within the meaning of the term defined.
(Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title I, § 2, 60 Stat. 141.)