Collapse to view only § 49.4262-1 - Taxable transportation.

§ 49.4261-1 - Imposition of tax; in general.

(a) In general. Section 4261 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) imposes three separate taxes on amounts paid for certain transportation of persons by air. Tax attaches at the time of payment for any transportation taxable under section 4261. The applicability of each section 4261 tax is generally determined on a flight-by-flight basis.

(1) Percentage tax. Section 4261(a) imposes a 7.5 percent tax on the amount paid for the taxable transportation of any person. See section 4262(a) of the Code and § 49.4262-1(a) for the definition of the term taxable transportation.

(2) Domestic segment tax. Section 4261(b)(1) imposes a $3 tax (indexed annually for inflation pursuant to section 4261(e)(4)) on the amount paid for each domestic segment of taxable transportation. See section 4261(b)(2) for the definition of the term domestic segment. The domestic segment tax does not apply to a domestic segment beginning or ending at an airport that is a rural airport for the calendar year in which the segment begins or ends (as the case may be). See section 4261(e)(1)(B) for the definition of the term rural airport.

(3) International travel facilities tax. Section 4261(c) imposes a $12 tax (indexed annually for inflation pursuant to section 4261(e)(4)) on any amount paid (whether within or without the United States) for any transportation by air that begins or ends in the United States. The international travel facilities tax does not apply to any transportation that is entirely taxable under section 4261(a) (determined without regard to sections 4281 and 4282). See section 4261(c)(2). A special rule applies to Alaska and Hawaii flights. See section 4261(c)(3).

(b) Payment and collection obligations - (1) In general. The taxes imposed by section 4261 are collected taxes. In general, the person making the payment subject to tax is the taxpayer. See section 4261(d). The person receiving the payment is the collector (also commonly referred to as the collecting agent). See section 4291 of the Code. The collector must collect the applicable tax from the taxpayer, report the tax on Form 720, Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return, and remit the tax to the Internal Revenue Service. See sections 4291, 6011, and 7501 of the Code. See § 40.6011(a)-1 of this chapter and § 49.4291-1. The collector must also make semimonthly deposits of the taxes imposed by section 4261. See section 6302(e) of the Code. See §§ 40.0-1(c), 40.6302(c)-1, and 40.6302(c)-3 of this chapter. See section 4263(a) and (c) of the Code for special rules relating to the payment and collection of tax.

(2) Failure to collect tax. If any tax imposed by section 4261 is not paid at the time payment for transportation is made, then, to the extent the tax is not collected under any other provision of subchapter C of chapter 33 of the Code, the tax must be paid by the carrier providing the initial segment of transportation that begins or ends in the United States. See section 4263(c). See section 6672 of the Code for rules relating to the application of the trust fund recovery penalty.

(c) Type of aircraft. The taxes imposed by section 4261 generally apply regardless of the type of aircraft on which the transportation is provided, provided all of the other conditions for liability are present and no specific statutory exemption applies. See paragraph (f) of this section for a list of statutory exemptions from tax. Amounts paid for the transportation of persons by air cushion vehicles, also known as hovercraft, are not subject to the taxes imposed by section 4261.

(d) Purpose of transportation. The purpose of the transportation (for example, business or pleasure) is not a factor in determining taxability under section 4261.

(e) Routes. Amounts paid for transportation may be taxable even if the transportation is not between two definite points. Unless otherwise exempt, a payment for continuous transportation that begins and ends at the same point is subject to tax. See section 4281 of the Code and § 49.4281-1 for the exemption for small aircraft on nonestablished lines.

(f) Exemptions from tax; cross-references - (1) Aircraft management services. For the exemption for certain aircraft management services, see section 4261(e)(5) of the Code and § 49.4261-10.

(2) Hard minerals, oil, and gas. For the exemption for certain uses related to the exploration, development, or removal of hard minerals, oil, or gas, see section 4261(f)(1).

(3) Trees and logging operations. For the exemption for certain uses related to trees and logging operations, see section 4261(f)(2).

(4) Air ambulances. For the exemption for air ambulances providing certain emergency medical transportation, see section 4261(g).

(5) Skydiving. For the exemption for certain skydiving uses, see section 4261(h).

(6) Seaplanes. For the exemption for certain seaplane segments, see section 4261(i).

(7) Fractionally-owned aircraft. For the exemption for certain aircraft in fractional ownership aircraft programs, see section 4261(j).

(8) Small aircraft on nonestablished lines. For the exemption for certain small aircraft on nonestablished lines, see section 4281 of the Code and § 49.4281-1.

(9) Affiliated groups. For the exemption for certain transportation of members of an affiliated group, see section 4282.

(10) United States and territories. For exemptions authorized by the Secretary of the Treasury or his delegate for the exclusive use of the United States, see section 4293.

(g) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5001, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-2 - Application of tax.

(a) Tax on total amount paid. The tax imposed by section 4261(a) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) is measured by the total amount paid for taxable transportation, whether paid in cash or in kind.

(b) Tax on transportation of each person. The taxes imposed by section 4261(b) and (c) of the Code are head taxes and, therefore, apply on a per-passenger basis. The taxes apply to each passenger for whom an amount is paid, regardless of whether the payment is made as a single lump sum or is made individually for each passenger. In the case of charter flights for which a fixed amount is paid, the section 4261(b) and (c) taxes are computed by multiplying the applicable rate of tax by the number of passengers transported on the aircraft.

(c) Charges for nontransportation services. Where a payment covers charges for nontransportation services as well as for transportation of a person, such as charges for meals, hotel accommodations, etc., the charges for the nontransportation services may be excluded in computing the tax payable with respect to such payment, provided such charges are separable and are shown in the exact amounts thereof in the records pertaining to the transportation charge. If the charges for nontransportation services are not separable from the charge for transportatinon of the person, the tax must be computed upon the full amount of the payment.

(d) Applicability date. Paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section apply to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6518, 25 FR 13134, Dec. 21, 1960, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11222, Nov. 14, 1962; T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5001, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-3 - Payments made within the United States.

(a) Transportation beginning and ending in the United States or the 225-mile zone. The taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) applies to payments made within the United States for transportation which begins in the United States or in the 225-mile zone and ends in the United States or in the 225-mile zone. For example, an amount paid within the United States for transportation between New York and Montreal, Canada; between Vancouver, Canada, and Windsor, Canada; or between Nogales, Mexico, and Hermosillo, Mexico, would be fully taxable under section 4261(a) and (b). See section 4262(c) (2) and paragraph (b) of § 49.4262-3for the definition of the term “225-mile zone”.

(b) Other transportation. In the case of transportation, other than that described in paragraph (a) of this section, for which payment is made in the United States, the taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b) apply with respect to the amount paid for that portion of such transportation by air which is directly or indirectly from one port or station in the United States to another port or station in the United States, but only if such portion is not a part of uninterrupted international air transportation within the meaning of section 4262(c)(3) of the Code and § 49.4262-3(c). Transportation that:

(1) Begins in the United States or the 225-mile zone and ends outside such area,

(2) Begins outside the United States or the 225-mile zone and ends inside such area, or

(3) Begins outside the United States and ends outside such area, is taxable only with respect to the portion of the transportation by air which is directly or indirectly from one port or station in the United States to another port or station in the United States, but only if such portion is not a part of “uninterrupted international air transportation” within the meaning of section 4262(c)(3) and § 49.4262-3(c). Thus, on a trip by air from Chicago to London, England, with a stopover at New York, for which payment is made in the United States, if the portion from Chicago to New York is not a part of “uninterrupted international air transportation” within the meaning of section 4262(c)(3) and § 49.4262-3(c), the taxes would apply to the part of the payment which is applicable to the transportation from Chicago to New York. However, if the portion from Chicago to New York is a part of “uninterrupted international air transportation” within the meaning of section 4262(c)(3) and § 49.4262-3(c), the taxes would not apply.

(c) Method of computing tax on taxable portion. Where a payment is made for transportation which is partially taxable under paragraph (b) of this section, the tax imposed by section 4261(a) may be computed on that proportion of the total amount paid which the mileage of the taxable portion of the transportation bears to the mileage of the entire trip.

(d) Cross reference. See section 4262(b) of the Code and § 49.4262-2for a partial exclusion with respect to amounts paid for certain transportation.

(e) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11222, Nov. 14, 1962; T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5001, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-4 - Payments made within the United States; evidence of nontaxability.

(a) Presumption of taxability. The tax imposed by section 4261 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) shall apply to any amount paid within the United States for the transportation of any person, unless the taxpayer establishes in accordance with the provisions of this section that at the time of payment the transportation is not transportation in respect of which tax is imposed by section 4261 (see section 4263(d) of the Code).

(b) Through tickets. In the case of transportation which is wholly or in part not taxable transportation, the issuance of one ticket (commonly known as a “through ticket”) covering such transportation will be sufficient to establish that the amount paid for such transportation is wholly or in part not subject to tax. Thus, if A purchases a through ticket in the United States for transportation by air which begins before November 16, 1962, from Chicago to Edmonton, Canada, with a stopover in Minneapolis, no further evidence will be required to establish that no tax applies with respect to the amount paid for the portion of transportation between Minneapolis and Edmonton. A similar result will be reached if a through ticket is purchased for the same air transportation which begins after November 15, 1962, and the trip is not “uninterrupted international air transportation” within the meaning of section 4262(c) (3) and paragraph (c) of § 49.4262-3. See paragraph (d) of this section for the information to be inscribed on all tickets issued for uninterrupted international air transportation.

(c) Separate tickets. Where a separate ticket or order is issued for taxable transportation as defined in section 4262 (a) (1) (referred to in this subpart as the “domestic ticket or order”), but the domestic ticket or order is to be used in conjunction with a ticket or order for additional transportation (referred to in this subpart as the “international ticket or order”) which changes the tax consequences, unless the domestic ticket or order and the international ticket or order are purchased from a single agency or carrier at the same time, the person making payment for the domestic ticket or order shall at the time of payment exhibit the international ticket or order to the agency or carrier receiving such payment. The agency or carrier which receives the payment for the domestic ticket or order shall inscribe the tickets or orders for the entire journey in the following manner:

(1) The international ticket or order shall be inscribed or stamped with an appropriate legend (for example, “Cannot be reused to obtain any tax exemption on a domestic ticket or order”) to show that a domestic ticket or order has been purchased wholly or partially tax free for use in conjunction therewith.

(2) The domestic ticket or order shall be inscribed to show (i) the identity of the agency or carrier which received payment therefor (unless otherwise shown on the ticket or order), (ii) the origin and destination of the additional transportation, (iii) the identify of the carrier furnishing the additional transportation, and (iv) the serial number of the ticket or order covering such additional transportation. If the domestic ticket or order is not large enough to accommodate the prescribed inscription, a statement setting forth the required information shall be attached to such ticket or order.

(d) Tickets issued for uninterrupted international air transportation. All tickets issued for “uninterrupted international air transportation” within the meaning of section 4262(c) (3) and paragraph (c) of § 49.4262-3, whether through tickets or separate tickets, must have inscribed thereon, in addition to the other information required in the regulations in this subpart, sufficient information from which may be ascertained the scheduled arrival and departure time at each stopover to which the 12-hour scheduled interval requirement of section 4262(c)(3) applies. It will be sufficient, for example, if the airline ticket or tickets show the trip number and the date and time of departure of the aircraft from each such stopover point, provided the published airline schedules show the scheduled time of arrival at each such stopover point.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11223, Nov. 14, 1962; T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5003, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-5 - Payments made outside the United States.

(a) In general. The tax imposed by section 4261(a) and (b)applies to amounts paid outside the United States for the taxable transportation of persons, but only if such transportation begins and ends in the United States. Thus, in addition to the exclusion provided for certain travel under section 4261(a) and (b), the tax imposed by section 4261(a) and (b), shall not apply unless the transportation both begins and ends within the United States. Accordingly, the tax does not apply to a payment made outside the United States for one-way or round-trip transportation between a point within the United States and a point outside the United States.

(b) Transportation between two or more points in the United States. (1) For purposes of this section, a payment made outside the United States for transportation between two or more points in the United States is a payment for transportation which begins and ends in the United States, even though additional transportation to or from a point outside the United States is involved in the entire journey, if at the time of making payment for the transportation between two or more points in the United States it is not definitely established, under the rules set forth in § 49.4261-6, that such transportation is purchased for use in making the journey from or to a point outside the United States. The fact that the entire journey includes transportation from or to a point outside the United States is not in itself determinative of the liability for tax.

(2) The following examples illustrate the application of this paragraph:

Example (1).W travels from Havana, Cuba to New York by way of Miami. He purchases in Havana a steamship ticket for his transportation from Havana to Miami and an exchange order for air transportation from Miami to New York. The ticket for the connecting transportation from Havana to Miami, and the order for the transportation from Miami to New York were not appropriately inscribed by the agency or carrier which received the payment for the air transportation involved at the time such payment was received so as to clearly show that the ticket and order were purchased for use in conjunction with each other. Therefore, the agency or carrier which accepts the exchange order and issues the ticket for the transportation from Miami to New York is required to collect the tax which applies to the amount paid outside the United States for such transportation. Example (2).X travels on a round trip from Montreal, Canada, to Los Angeles by way of New York. He purchases in Montreal air transportation for the round trip between New York and Los Angeles, and uses a private automobile for transportation from Montreal to New York and return to Montreal. The amount paid in Montreal for the round-trip transportation between New York and Los Angeles is a payment for transportation which begins and ends in the United States and is therefore subject to tax.

(c) Cross reference. See section 4262(b) and § 49.4262-2 for a partial exclusion with respect to amounts paid for certain transportation.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended at T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5003, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-6 - Payments made outside the United States; evidence of nontaxability.

(a) In general. The tax does not apply to a payment made outside the United States for transportation which begins or ends outside the United States. For purposes of the preceding sentence, a payment made outside the United States for transportation between two or more points within the United States (such transportation being referred to hereinafter in this section as “the United States portion”), which is part of transportation from or to a point outside the United States is a payment for transportation which begins or ends outside the United States, where it is definitely established at the time of making payment for the United States portion that such portion is purchased for use in making the journey from or to a point outside the United States. The nontaxable character of the payment made outside the United States for the United States portion shall be established under the rules set forth in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section.

(b) Through tickets. Where one ticket (commonly known as a “through ticket”) is issued to cover all of the United States portion of a journey which begins or ends outside the United States and to cover also the connecting transportation from or to a point outside the United States, no further evidence of the nontaxable character of the transportation covered by such ticket will be required.

(c) Separate tickets. Where separate tickets or orders are issued for the United States portion of a journey which begins or ends outside the United States, the agency or carrier which receives payment for such tickets or orders shall definitely determine at the time of receiving the payment that the United States portion is being purchased for use in conjunction with connecting transportation from or to a point outside the United States, and shall appropriately inscribe the tickets or orders issued outside the United States for the United States portion and for the connecting transportation from or to a point outside the United States to show clearly that such tickets or orders are purchased for use in conjunction with each other. Such tickets or orders shall be inscribed in the following manner:

(1) The ticket or order for the connecting transportation from or to a point outside the United States shall be inscribed or stamped with an appropriate legend (for example, “Not to be used again for purchase of tax-free United States transportation”) to show that the United States portion has been purchased tax free for use in conjunction therewith.

(2) Where the ticket for the United States portion is issued outside the United States, it shall be inscribed to show (i) the identity of the agency or carrier which received payment therefor (unless otherwise shown on the ticket), (ii) the origin and destination of the connecting transportation, (iii) the identity of the carrier furnishing the connecting transportation, and (iv) the serial number of the ticket or order covering such connecting transportation. If the ticket is not large enough to accommodate the prescribed inscription, a statement setting forth the required information shall be attached to such ticket.

(3) Where an order for the United States portion is issued outside the United States, it shall be inscribed to show (i) the origin and destination of the connecting transportation, (ii) the identity of the carrier furnishing the connecting transportation, and (iii) the serial number of the ticket or order covering such connecting transportation.

(d) Ticket issued pursuant to inscribed order. Where the ticket for the United States portion is issued in the United States pursuant to an order which was purchased and properly inscribed outside the United States under the rules set forth in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, liability for payment or collection of tax will not be incurred upon the issuance of the ticket provided the agency or carrier issuing such ticket stamps or inscribes thereon an appropriate legend, for example, “Tax not paid - furnished on order”, or “Exempt - order”.

(e) Maintenance of records. In any case where a payment for the United States portion is not subject to tax under the rules set forth in this section, the carrier furnishing transportation for the United States portion shall procure and maintain appropriate evidence which will clearly show that the tickets or orders for such transportation were purchased for use in conjunction with connecting transportation from or to a point outside the United States.

(f) Examples. The following are examples of nontaxable transportation:

Example (1).Y travels from London, England, to San Francisco by way of New York. He purchases from an agency or carrier in England all of the transportation involved in such journey, which includes air transportation from London to New York and from New York to San Francisco, for which separate tickets are issued. The agency or carrier which receives the payment for Y's transportation from New York to San Francisco will not be required to collect tax with respect to the payment, provided it determines at the time such payment is received that the transportation in question is being purchased for use in conjunction with the connecting transportation from London to New York and it appropriately inscribes both of the tickets for the journey. Example (2).Z travels from Havana, Cuba, to New York by way of Miami. He purchases in Havana a ticket for his transportation by water from Havana to Miami, and later purchases from a travel agency in Havana air transportation from Miami to New York for which the travel agency issues an exchange order. To establish the nontaxable character of the payment for Z's transportation from Miami to New York the travel agency shall determine at the time payment is received by it that the transportation is being purchased for use in conjunction with the connecting transportation from Havana to Miami, and shall make the appropriate inscription on the ticket and the order. The carrier which accepts the exchange order and issues the ticket for the transportation from Miami to New York will not be required to collect tax with respect to the ticket so issued if it appropriately inscribes the ticket as provided in paragraph (d) of this section.

§ 49.4261-7 - Examples of payments subject to tax.

The following are examples of payments for transportation which, unless otherwise exempt under section 4261, 4281, 4282, or 4293 of the Internal Revenue Code are subject to tax:

(a) Cash fares. The tax applies to payments of so-called “cash fares” where no ticket or other evidence of the right to transportation is issued to the passenger.

(b) [Reserved]

(c) Additional charges. Amounts paid as additional charges for changing the class of accommodations, changing the destination or route, extending the time limit of a ticket, as “extra fare”, or for exclusive occupancy of a section, etc., are subject to the tax.

(d)-(e) [Reserved]

(f) Prepaid orders, exchange orders, or similar orders. The tax applies to the amounts paid for prepaid orders, exchange orders, or similar orders for transportation. Additional amounts paid in procuring transportation in connection with the use of prepaid orders, exchange orders, or similar orders, are likewise subject to tax.

(g) [Reserved]

(h) Aircraft charters - (1) When no charge is made by the charterer of an aircraft to the persons transported, the amount paid by the charterer for the charter of the aircraft is subject to tax.

(2) The charterer of an aircraft who sells transportation to other persons must collect and account for the tax with respect to all amounts paid to the charterer by such other persons. In such case, no tax will be due on the amount paid by the charterer for the charter of the aircraft but it shall be the duty of the owner of the aircraft to advise the charterer of the charterer's obligation for collecting, accounting for, and paying over the tax to the Internal Revenue Service.

(i) All-expense tours. Amounts paid for all-expense tours are subject to tax with respect to that portion representing transportation which is subject to tax. See §§ 49.4261-2(c) and 49.4261-8(f)(4).

(j) Payments remitted to foreign countries by persons in the United States. Payments for transportation tickets, prepaid orders, exchange orders, or similar orders are subject to the tax where the payment for such tickets or orders is accomplished by the purchaser either (1) by transmission from within the United States via telegraph or mail of cash, checks, postal or telegraphic money orders, and similar drafts to ticket offices or travel agencies, etc., located in any place without the United States, or (2) by the delivery of the funds to an agency located in the United States for transmission to ticket offices, or travel agencies, etc., without the United States. Such payments are considered to be payments made within the United States.

(k) Applicability date. Paragraph (h) of this section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11223, Nov. 14, 1962; T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5003, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-8 - Examples of payments not subject to tax.

In addition to a payment specifically exempt under section 4261, 4281, 4282, or 4293 of the Internal Revenue Code the following are examples of payments not subject to tax:

(a) Exchange of prepaid order, scrip, etc., for tickets. A ticket issued pursuant to an exchange order, prepaid order, airline pilot order, or scrip, is not subject to tax where the tax is paid at the time of payment for the order or scrip.

(b) Caretakers and messengers accompanying freight shipments. The tax on the transportation of persons does not apply to amounts paid for transportation of freight that includes also the transportation of caretakers or messengers for which no specific charge as such is made.

(c) Special baggage transportation equipment. An amount paid for special baggage transportation equipment is not subject to the tax on the transportation of persons if separable from the payment for transportation of persons and if shown in the exact amount of the charge on the records covering the taxable transportation payment.

(d) Circus or show conveyances. The amount paid pursuant to a contract for the movement of a circus or show conveyance where the amount covers only the transportation of the performers, laborers, animals, equipment, etc., by such conveyances is not subject to the tax on the transportation of persons imposed by section 4261. However, if the contract payment also covers the issuance to advance agents, bill posters, etc., of circus or show scrip books, or other evidence of the right to transportation, for use on regular passenger conveyances, that portion of the contract payment properly allocable to such scrip books or other evidence is subject to the tax on the transportation of persons.

(e) Corpses. The tax on the transportation of persons does not apply to the amount paid for the transportation of a corpse, but does apply to the amount paid for the transportation of any person accompanying the corpse.

(f) Miscellaneous charges. Where the charge is separable from the payment for the transportation of a person and is shown in the exact amount thereof on the records pertaining to the transportation payment, the tax on the transportation of persons does not apply to the following and similar charges:

(1) Charges for transportation of baggage, including incidental charges such as excess value, storage, transfer, parcel checking, special delivery, etc.

(2)-(3) [Reserved]

(4) Charges for admissions, guides, meals, hotel accommodations, and other nontransportation services, for example, where such items are included in a lump sum payment for an all-expense tour.

(5) [Reserved]

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11223, Nov. 14, 1962; T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5003, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-9 - Mileage awards.

(a) Tax imposed. Any amount paid (and the value of any other benefit provided) to an air carrier (or any related person) for the right to provide mileage awards for or other reductions in the cost of any transportation of persons by air is an amount paid for taxable transportation and is therefore subject to the tax imposed by section 4261(a) of the Internal Revenue Code. See section 4261(e)(3)(A).

(b) [Reserved]

(c) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021.

[T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5003, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4261-10 - Aircraft management services.

(a) In general - (1) Overview. This section prescribes rules relating to the exemption under section 4261(e)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) for amounts paid (in cash or in kind) by an aircraft owner to an aircraft management services provider for certain aircraft management services (aircraft management services exemption). Pursuant to section 4261(e)(5), the tax imposed by section 4261 of the Code does not apply to amounts paid by an aircraft owner to an aircraft management services provider for aircraft management services related to maintenance and support of the aircraft owner's aircraft; or related to flights on the aircraft owner's aircraft (flight services). The aircraft management services exemption applies to amounts paid by an aircraft owner to an aircraft management services provider for flight services on the aircraft owner's aircraft, even if the aircraft owner is not on the flight. The aircraft management services exemption does not apply to amounts paid to an aircraft management services provider by another person on behalf of an aircraft owner (other than in a principal-agent scenario in which the aircraft owner is the principal). In addition, amounts paid for aircraft management services by a party related to the aircraft owner are not amounts paid by the aircraft owner solely by virtue of the relationship between the aircraft owner and the related party. However, if an aircraft owner leases an aircraft to another person, including a related party, amounts paid by the lessee to an aircraft management services provider for aircraft management services related to the leased aircraft qualify for the aircraft management services exemption, provided the lease is not a disqualified lease and all other requirements of section 4261(e)(5) are satisfied. For example, amounts paid for aircraft management services by one member of an affiliated group (as that term is defined in section 4282 of the Code) for flights on an aircraft owned by another member of the affiliated group are not amounts paid by the aircraft owner unless the member owning the aircraft leases the aircraft to the member of the affiliated group that pays for the aircraft management services. See paragraph (b) of this section for definitions of terms used in this section.

(2) Private aviation. The aircraft management services exemption is limited to aircraft management services related to aircraft used in private aviation.

(3) Adequate records required. In order to qualify for the aircraft management services exemption, an aircraft owner and aircraft management services provider must maintain adequate records to show that the amounts paid by the aircraft owner to the aircraft management services provider relate to aircraft management services specifically for the aircraft owner's aircraft or for flights on the aircraft owner's aircraft and to support any allocations required under paragraph (c) under of this section. Such records may include the agreement, if any, between the aircraft owner and the aircraft management services provider, evidence of aircraft ownership, evidence that amounts paid for aircraft management services came from the aircraft owner, and the aircraft management services provider's fee schedule.

(b) Definitions. This paragraph provides definitions applicable to this section.

(1) Aircraft management services. The term aircraft management services means -

(i) Statutory services. The services listed in section 4261(e)(5)(B)(i)-(v); and

(ii) Other services. Any service (including, but not limited to, purchasing fuel, purchasing aircraft parts, and arranging for the fueling of an aircraft owner's aircraft) provided directly or indirectly to an aircraft owner in order to provide air transportation to the aircraft owner on the aircraft owner's aircraft at a level and quality of service required under the agreement between the aircraft owner and the aircraft management services provider.

(2) Aircraft management services provider. The term aircraft management services provider means a person that provides aircraft management services to an aircraft owner.

(3) Aircraft owner - (i) In general. Except as otherwise provided in this section, the term aircraft owner means a person that owns an aircraft managed by an aircraft management services provider (commonly referred to as a managed aircraft), or a person that leases a managed aircraft (lessee) pursuant to a lease that is not a disqualified lease. A person owns a managed aircraft if the person holds legal title to the aircraft, or if the person holds substantial incidents of ownership in the aircraft for a period of more than 31 days. A lessee includes the beneficiary of an owner trust that holds legal title to the managed aircraft.

(ii) Persons not included in the definition of aircraft owner. A lessee of an aircraft under a disqualified lease cannot be an aircraft owner with respect to the aircraft leased pursuant to the disqualified lease. A person that owns stock in a commercial airline does not qualify as an aircraft owner of that commercial airline's aircraft. A participant in a fractional aircraft ownership program, as defined in section 4043(c)(2) of the Code, does not qualify as an aircraft owner of the program's managed aircraft if the amount paid for such person's participation is exempt from the tax imposed by section 4261 reason of section 4261(j).

(4) Disqualified lease. The term disqualified lease has the meaning given to it by section 4261(e)(5)(C)(ii).

(5) Fair market value. The term fair market value means the value of comparable flights or services provided with respect to a comparable aircraft as of the date such flights or services are provided. The aircraft management services provider's published fee schedule in effect on the date(s) the flights or services are provided may be used as evidence of fair market value.

(6) For-hire flight. The term for-hire flight means the use of an aircraft to transport passengers for compensation that is paid in cash or in kind. The term includes, but is not limited to, charter flights, air taxi flights, and sightseeing flights (commonly referred to as flightseeing flights).

(7) Owner trust. The term owner trust means an arrangement in which legal title of an aircraft is held in the name of the trustee of the trust for the limited purpose of registering the aircraft in the United States with the Federal Aviation Administration pursuant to the registration requirements in 49 U.S.C. 40102(a) and 44102(a), and 14 CFR part 47.

(8) Private aviation. The term private aviation means the use of an aircraft for civilian flights, except scheduled passenger service for which tickets (or substitutes equivalent to tickets) are sold on a seat-by-seat basis to the general public. The term includes, but is not limited to, civilian flights operated under Part 135 (14 CFR part 135) of the Federal Aviation Regulations prescribed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FARs).

(9) Substitute aircraft. The term substitute aircraft means an aircraft, other than the aircraft owner's aircraft, that is provided by an aircraft management services provider to the aircraft owner when the aircraft owner's aircraft is not available, regardless of the reason for the unavailability.

(c) Pro rata allocation - (1) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2)(iii) of this section, when an amount paid to an aircraft management services provider includes a portion that is subject to the tax imposed by section 4261 and a portion that consists of amounts described in section 4261(e)(5)(A), the exception in section 4261(e)(5) applies on a pro rata basis only to the portion that consists of amounts described in section 4261(e)(5)(A). See section 4261(e)(5)(D). In such case, the tax base for the portion that is subject to the tax imposed by section 4261(a) is the amount paid for the flights or services, provided the amount paid is separable and shown in exact amounts in the records pertaining to the charge. If the portion of the amount paid that is subject to the tax imposed by section 4261(a) is not separable, the tax base is the fair market value of the flights or services. However, the tax base determined in the previous sentence may not exceed the total amount paid (that is, the sum of the portion that is subject to the tax imposed by section 4261(a) and the portion that consists of amounts described in section 4261(e)(5)(A)).

(2) Substitute aircraft - (i) Flight treated as a charter. If an aircraft management services provider provides a flight to an aircraft owner on a substitute aircraft, the flight is treated as a charter flight provided by the aircraft management services provider to the aircraft owner, regardless of whether the aircraft owner is on the flight, and the aircraft owner is treated as the charterer of such flight. If the flight constitutes taxable transportation, as defined in section 4262 of the Code, the tax imposed by section 4261(a) applies, unless the flight is exempt from such tax by reason of an exemption other than the aircraft management services exemption. See section 4261(b) and (c) for other taxes that may apply to flights provided by an aircraft management services provider to an aircraft owner on substitute aircraft.

(ii) General rule for flights provided on substitute aircraft. In cases where an aircraft management services provider provides a flight to an aircraft owner on a substitute aircraft and an allocation is required, the rule in paragraph (c)(1) of this section applies in determining the tax base. In all other cases, the tax base and the tax imposed by section 4261(a) thereon must be determined in accordance with the rules of § 49.4261-7(h)(1), unless the flight is otherwise exempt from such tax by reason of an exemption other than the aircraft management services exemption.

(iii) Special rule for for-hire flights provided on substitute aircraft. In cases where a substitute aircraft is used to provide a for-hire flight and an amount is paid for the flight by someone other than the aircraft owner, the tax base and the tax imposed by section 4261(a) thereon must be determined in accordance with the rules in § 49.4261-7(h)(2), unless the flight is otherwise exempt from such tax by reason of an exemption other than the aircraft management services exemption.

(d) Choice of flight rules. Whether a flight on an aircraft owner's aircraft operates pursuant to the rules under FARs Part 91 (14 CFR part 91) or pursuant to the rules under FARs Part 135 does not affect the application of section 4261(e)(5).

(e) Aircraft available for hire. Whether an aircraft owner permits an aircraft management services provider or other person to use its aircraft to provide for-hire flights (for example, when the aircraft is not being used by the aircraft owner or when the aircraft is being moved in deadhead service) does not affect the application of section 4261(e)(5). However, an amount paid for for-hire flights on the aircraft owner's aircraft, except payments made by the aircraft owner, does not qualify for the aircraft management services exemption under section 4261(e)(5). Therefore, an amount paid by someone other than the aircraft owner for a for-hire flight on the aircraft owner's aircraft is subject to the tax imposed by section 4261 unless the flight is otherwise exempt from such tax by reason of an exemption other than the aircraft management services exemption. See § 49.4261-7(h) for rules relating to the application of the tax imposed by section 4261 on amounts paid for certain charter flights.

(f) Billing methods. Except as otherwise provided in this section, the method an aircraft management services provider bills, invoices, or otherwise charges an aircraft owner for aircraft management services, whether by specific itemization of costs, flat monthly or hourly fee, or otherwise, does not affect the application of section 4261(e)(5).

(g) Multiple aircraft management services providers not disqualifying. Whether an aircraft owner pays amounts to more than one aircraft management services provider for aircraft management services does not affect the application of section 4261(e)(5).

(h) Examples. The following examples illustrate the provisions of this section.

(1) Example 1 - (i) Facts. During the first quarter of 2021, an aircraft owner pays a $3,000 monthly management fee to an aircraft management services provider for services related to operating the aircraft owner's aircraft. The aircraft owner used its own aircraft for all but one of the flights the owner took during the period. On the one occasion that the aircraft owner's aircraft was unavailable when the aircraft owner wanted to fly, the aircraft management services provider used a substitute aircraft to transport the aircraft owner. The flight was within the continental United States and the aircraft owner received no compensation for the transportation of other passengers on the flight. The aircraft owner paid $1,000 for the flight on the substitute aircraft. The aircraft management services provider included the $1,000 charge for the substitute aircraft as a separate line item on the monthly management fee invoice.

(ii) Analysis. The tax imposed by section 4261(a) applies to services that do not qualify for the section 4261(e)(5) exemption; in this case, the flight provided on the substitute aircraft. The flight provided on the substitute aircraft is treated as a charter flight for purposes of the tax imposed by section 4261(a), and the owner is treated as the charterer of the flight. The amount paid by the aircraft owner for the flight on the substitute aircraft is the section 4261(a) tax base. The monthly invoice from the aircraft management services provider to the aircraft owner included a line item in the amount of $1,000 for the charter flight. Because $1,000 is the actual amount paid for the flight, this amount is the section 4261(a) tax base. The tax imposed by section 4261(b) also applies to the flight on a per-passenger basis. See § 49.4261-2(b) for rules regarding the application of the tax imposed by section 4261(b).

(2) Example 2 - (i) Facts. Same facts as in paragraph (h)(1) of this section (Example 1), except the invoice does not show the amount paid for the flight on the substitute aircraft and that amount is not otherwise separable from the monthly management fee. The fair market value of the flight on the substitute aircraft is $1,000.

(ii) Analysis. The tax imposed by section 4261(a) applies to the flight provided on the substitute aircraft. The amount paid for the flight on the substitute aircraft is not otherwise separable from the monthly management fee. Because $1,000 is the fair market value of the flight, and such amount does not exceed the $3,000 monthly management fee paid by the aircraft owner, this amount is the section 4261(a) tax base. The tax imposed by section 4261(b) also applies to the flight on a per-passenger basis. See § 49.4261-2(b) for rules regarding the application of the tax imposed by section 4261(b).

(3) Example 3 - (i) Facts. An aircraft owner pays a monthly management fee to an aircraft management services provider for aircraft management services related to the aircraft owner's aircraft. When the aircraft is not being used by the owner, the owner sometimes permits a charter company to use the aircraft to provide charter flights. At other times when the aircraft is not being used by the owner, the owner permits a tour operator to use the aircraft for flightseeing tours. All charter and flightseeing flights on the aircraft constitute taxable transportation, as that term is defined in section 4262, and no exemptions (other than section 4261(e)(5)) apply. No charter or flightseeing flights are provided on a substitute aircraft. The aircraft's maximum certificated takeoff weight is 7,000 pounds.

(ii) Analysis. Amounts paid by the aircraft owner to the aircraft management services provider for aircraft management services related to the aircraft owner's aircraft are exempt under section 4261(e)(5). Amounts paid by the charterer or passengers for the charter flights are subject to tax under section 4261(a) and (b). See § 49.4261-7(h) for rules relating to the application of the tax imposed by section 4261 on amounts paid for charter flights. See § 49.4261-2(b) for rules regarding the application of the tax imposed by section 4261(b). Amounts paid by flightseeing customers for flightseeing tours are also subject to tax under section 4261(a) and (b). If a payment for a flightseeing tour includes charges for nontransportation services, the charges for the nontransportation services may be excluded in computing the tax payable provided the payments are separable and provided in exact amounts. See § 49.4261-2(c).

(i) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021.

[T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5003, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4262-1 - Taxable transportation.

(a) In general. Unless excluded under section 4262(b) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) (see § 49.4262-2), taxable transportation means:

(1) Transportation by air which begins in the United States or in that portion of Canada or Mexico which is not more than 225 miles from the nearest point in the continental United States (225-mile zone) and ends in the United States or in the 225-mile zone; and

(2) In the case of any other transportation by air, that portion of such transportation that is directly or indirectly from one port or station in the United States to another port or station in the United States, but only if such transportation is not part of uninterrupted international air transportation within the meaning of section 4262(c)(3) of the Code and § 49.4262-3(c). Transportation from one port or station in the United States occurs whenever a carrier, after leaving any port or station in the United States, makes a regularly scheduled stop at another port or station in the United States irrespective of whether stopovers are permitted or whether passengers disembark.

The provisions of this paragraph are applicable whether the transportation is by rail, motor vehicle, water, or air, or any combination thereof, except that with respect to transportation which begins after November 15, 1962, the tax, if applicable, applies only to the amount paid for that portion of the transportation which is by air.

(b) Illustrations of taxable transportation under section 4262(a) (1). In each of the following examples the transportation is taxable transportation and the amount paid within the United States for such transportation is subject to the taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b):

(1) New York to Seattle;

(2) New York to Vancouver, Canada, with a stop at Toronto, Canada;

(3) Chicago to Monterrey, Mexico;

(4) Montreal, Canada, to Toronto, Canada; and

(5) Miami to Los Angeles via Panama. If in the examples in paragraph (b)(1) and (5) of this section, payment for the transportation had been made outside the United States, such payment would nevertheless have been subject to tax since in each case the transportation begins and ends in the United States.

(c) [Reserved]

(d) Examples. The following examples illustrate the application of section 4262(a)(2) and the taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b) of the Code:

(1) Example (1). A purchases in New York a ticket for air transportation from New York to Nassau, Bahamas, with a scheduled stopover of 14 hours in Miami. The part of the transportation from New York to Miami is taxable transportation as defined in section 4262(a) because such transportation is from one station in the United States to another station in the United States and the trip is not uninterrupted international air transportation (because the scheduled stopover interval in Miami is greater than 12 hours). Therefore, the amount paid for the transportation from New York to Miami is subject to the taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b).

(2) [Reserved]

(3)A purchases a through ticket for air transportation from San Francisco to London with stopovers at Denver, Chicago, Philadelphia, and New York. At each stopover the air carrier has scheduled his arrival and departure within 12 hours. After arriving in Philadelphia, A, for his own convenience, decides to stopover for more than 12 hours. The total amount paid by A for his transportation from San Francisco to New York is subject to the taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b) since the scheduled interval between the beginning or end and the end or beginning of any two segments of the domestic portion of international air transportation exceeded 12 hours. If the stopover interval in Philadelphia is extended for more than 12 hours by the carrier solely for its own convenience such as making repairs to the aircraft, the domestic portion of A's trip will not become taxable, provided A continues his international air transportation no later than on the first available flight offered by the carrier.

(4) A purchases a through ticket for transportation by air from Los Angeles to Barbados with stopovers at Houston, Mexico City, Mexico, and Miami. At each stopover, except Mexico City, A's scheduled time of arrival and departure is within 12 hours. At Mexico City, A's scheduled time of arrival and departure exceeds 12 hours. The total amount paid by A for his transportation from Los Angeles to Miami, including that part of the transportation to and from Mexico City, is subject to tax since the transportation includes a portion which is indirectly from one port or station in the United States to another port or station in the United States (Houston to Miami via Mexico City) and the scheduled interval in Mexico City between two segments of such portion exceeds 12 hours. If A's scheduled arrival and departure at each stopover of his transportation which is directly or indirectly between ports or stations in the United States, including that at Mexico City, had been within a 12 hours interval and A had arrived and departed at each such stopover within that period, the transportation would have qualified as uninterrupted international air transportation and no part of the amount paid for the transportation by air from Los Angeles to Barbados would be subject to the taxes imposed by section 4261(a) and (b).

(e) Examples of transportation that is not taxable transportation. The following examples illustrate transportation that is not taxable transportation:

(1) New York to Trinidad with no intervening stops;

(2) Minneapolis to Edmonton, Canada, with a stop at Winnipeg, Canada;

(3) Los Angeles to Mexico City, Mexico, with stops at Tijuana and Guadalajara, Mexico;

(4) New York to Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada, by air with a scheduled stopover in Chicago of five hours. Amounts paid for the transportation referred to in examples set forth in paragraphs (e)(1), (2), and (3) of this section are not subject to the tax regardless of where payment is made, since none of the trips:

(i) Begin in the United States or in the 225-mile zone and end in the United States or in the 225-mile zone, nor

(ii) Contain a portion of transportation which is directly or indirectly from one port or station in the United States to another port or station in the United States. The amount paid within the United States for the transportation referred to in the example set forth in paragraph (4) of this section is not subject to tax since the entire trip (including the domestic portion thereof) is uninterrupted international air transportation within the meaning of section 4262(c)(3) and § 49.4262-3(c). In the event the transportation is paid for outside the United States, no tax is due since the transportation does not begin and end in the United States.

(f) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11223, Nov. 14, 1962. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5005, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4262-2 - Exclusion of certain travel.

(a) In general. Under section 4262(b) of the Internal Revenue Code taxable transportation does not include that portion of any transportation which meets all four of the following requirements:

(1) Such portion is outside the United States;

(2) Neither such portion nor any segment thereof is directly or indirectly:

(i) Between (a) a point where the route of the transportation leaves or enters the continental United States, or (b) a port or station in the 225-mile zone, and

(ii) A port or station in the 225-mile zone;

(3) Such portion:

(i) Begins at either (a) the point where the route of the transportation leaves the United States, or (b) a port or station in the 225-mile zone, and

(ii) Ends at either (a) the point where the route of the transportation enters the United States, or (b) a port or station in the 225-mile zone; and

(4) A direct line from the point (or the port or station) specified in subparagraph (3) (i) of this paragraph, to the point (or the port or station) specified in subparagraph (3) (ii) of this paragraph, passes through or over a point which is not within 225 miles of the United States. For purposes of this section, the route of the transportation shall be deemed to leave or enter the United States when it passes over (i) the international boundary line between any part of the United States and a contiguous foreign country, or (ii) a point three nautical miles (3.45 statute miles) from low tide on the coast line.

(b) Transportation to or from Alaska or Hawaii. (1) Under the provisions of section 4262(b) transportation between the continental United States or the 225-mile zone and Alaska or Hawaii will be partially exempt from the tax. The portion of such transportation which (i) is outside the United States, (ii) is not transportation between ports or stations within the continental United States or the 225-mile zone, and (iii) is not transportation between ports or stations within Alaska or Hawaii, meets all the requirements set forth in section 4262(b) and is excluded from taxable transportation.

(2) The provisions of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example (1).A buys a ticket for transportation by air from Seattle to Fairbanks, Alaska, via Ketchikan and Juneau, Alaska, and Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada. The portion of the transportation between the point where the route of the transportation leaves the continental United States and the point where it first enters Alaska (the three-mile limit or the international boundary) is not subject to tax. Example (2). [Reserved] Example (3).C purchases a ticket in the United States for transportation by air from Vancouver, Canada, to Honolulu, Hawaii. No part of the route followed by the carrier passes through or over any part of the continental United States. The only part of the payment made by C for this transportation which is subject to the tax is that applicable to the portion of the transportation between the three-mile limit off the coast of Hawaii and the airport in Honolulu.

(c) Method of computing tax on travel not excluded. (1) Where a payment is made for transportation which includes transportation excluded under the provisions of section 4262(b):

(i) The tax may be computed on that proportion of the total amount paid which the mileage of the taxable portion of the transportation bears to the mileage of the entire trip, or

(ii) If the taxable portion of the transportation includes transportation from one port or station to another port or station for which an applicable local fare of a like class is available, the tax may be computed on the amount of such local fare, plus an amount equivalent to that proportion of the remainder of the total amount paid which the mileage of the remainder of the taxable portion of the transportation bears to the remainder of the mileage of the entire trip. If the taxable transportation includes a leg from a station to a coastal gateway point of embarkation for which a uniform fare is charged regardless of the gateway point actually used, the tax on such a leg may be computed on the basis of such uniform fare. In the absence of a fare described in this subparagraph, the tax must be determined in accordance with subdivision (i) of this subparagraph. If the taxable portion of the transportation includes a leg between coastal gateway points of embarkation for which no additional fare is charged no tax shall be applicable to such leg of the transportation.

(2) The basis for determining the proportions described in subdivisions (i) and (ii) of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph shall be the average mileage of the established route traveled by the carrier between given points under normal circumstances.

(d) Example. The application of paragraph (c) of this section may be illustrated by the following example: A purchases in San Francisco a ticket for transportation by air to Honolulu, Hawaii. The portion of the transportation which is outside the continental United States and is outside Hawaii is excluded from taxable transportation. The tax applies to that part of the payment made by A which is applicable to the portion of the transportation between the airport in San Francisco and the three-mile limit off the coast of California (a distance of 15 miles) and between the three-mile limit off the coast of Hawaii and the airport in Honolulu (a distance of 5 miles). The part of the payment made by A which is applicable to the taxable portion of his transportation and the tax due thereon are computed in accordance with paragraph (c)(1) as follows:

Table 1 to Paragraph (d)

Mileage of entire trip (San Francisco airport to Honolulu airport) (miles)2,400
Mileage in continental United States (miles)15
Mileage in Hawaii (miles)5
20
Fare from San Francisco to Honolulu$168.00
Payment for taxable portion (20/2400 × $168)$1.40
Tax due (7.5% (rate in effect on date of payment) × $1.40)$0.11

(All distances and fares assumed for purposes of this example. This example addresses only the computation of the tax imposed by section 4261(a). It does not address the computation of any other tax imposed by section 4261 that may apply to these facts.)

(e) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11224, Nov. 14, 1962. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5006, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4262-3 - Definitions.

(a) The continental United States. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, the term “continental United States” means the District of Columbia and the States other than Alaska and Hawaii, including inland waters (such as rivers, lakes, bays, etc.) lying wholly therein, and, where an international boundary line divides inland waters, such parts of such inland waters as lie within the boundary of the United States, and also the waters 3 nautical miles (3.45 statute miles) from low tide on the coast line.

(b) The 225-mile zone. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, the term “225-mile zone” means that portion of Canada and Mexico which is not more than 225 miles from the nearest point in the continental United States. Whether any point in Canada or Mexico is more than 225 miles from the continental United States is to be determined by measuring the distance from such point to the nearest point on the boundary of the continental United States.

(c) Uninterrupted International air transportation. (1) For the purpose of the regulations in this subpart, the term “uninterrupted international air transportation” means transportation entirely by air which does not begin in the United States or in the 225-mile zone and end in the United States or in the 225-mile zone provided that:

(i) Where the transportation within the United States involves one stop, the scheduled interval between the beginning or end of the United States portion of such air transportation and the end or beginning of the remainder of the air transportation, and

(ii) Where the United States portion of such transportation involves two or more stops, the scheduled interval between the beginning or end of one segment and the end or beginning of the continuing segment of such portion does not exceed 12 hours. The transportation is considered to be entirely by air even though the passenger may use other means of transportation between two airports provided the scheduled 12-hour limitation for his continuing air transportation is complied with. Transportation which otherwise is uninterrupted international air transportation does not cease to be such because of the use of non-air transportation between ports or stations which are outside the United States, provided the non-air transportation is not part of transportation which is indirectly from one port or station in the United States to another port or station in the United States.

(2) Where the interval between arrival and departure time at any stopover point in the United States exceeds 12 hours, such transportation is not uninterrupted international air transportation even though the schedules of the air lines do not make possible a scheduling within the 12-hour limit. Where any interval scheduled for 12 hours or less is increased to exceed 12 hours, the transportation will continue to be uninterrupted international air transportation if the increase in time is attributable to delays in the arrival or departure of the scheduled air transportation. In such case the transportation shall continue to be uninterrupted international air transportation if the passenger continues his transportation no later than on the first available flight offered by the continuing carrier which affords the passenger substantially the same accommodations as originally purchased. However, if for any other reason such interval at any stopover is increased to more than 12 hours, the transportation will lose its classification of uninterrupted international air transportation. The tax applicable in such case shall be paid as provided in § 49.4263-3(a)(2). The transportation from the point of orgin in the United States to a port or station outside the United States and the 225-mile zone, with a stopover in the United States, must be scheduled before the time the initial transportation commences in order for the United States portion of such transportation to qualify as uninterrupted international air transportation. For example, where transportation by air from Chicago to New York only is scheduled in Chicago and transportation by air from New York to London, England, is scheduled by the passenger after his arrival in New York, the Chicago to New York trip does not qualify as uninterrupted international air transportation even though the passenger may depart on the London flight within 12 hours after arrival in New York.

(d) Transportation. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, the term transportation includes layover or waiting time and movement of the aircraft in deadhead service.

(e) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11225, Nov. 14, 1962; 27 FR 11691, Nov. 28, 1962. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4263-1 - Duty to collect the tax; payments made outside the United States.

(a) Duty to collect tax. Where payment upon which tax is imposed by section 4261 of the Internal Revenue Code is made outside the United States for a prepaid order, exchange order, or similar order, the person furnishing the initial transportation pursuant to such order must collect the applicable tax. See section 4291 and the regulations under section 4291 for cases where persons receiving payment must collect the tax. See section 6672 for rules relating to the application of the trust fund recovery penalty.

(b) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4263-2 - Duty to collect the tax in the case of certain refunds.

(a) Special rule for collection of tax. Section 4263(b) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) provides a special rule for the collection of the tax where an unused ticket or order (or portion thereof) purchased without payment of tax is presented for refund and, as a result of the use of only a portion of the transportation purchased in connection with such ticket or order, liability for payment of tax has been incurred. In such a case, the person making the refund shall deduct the amount of the tax due, to the extent available, from the amount which would otherwise be refundable. If the redemption value of the unused ticket or order (or portion thereof) is less than the amount of the tax due on the amount paid for the travel actually performed, the person redeeming the unused ticket or order (or portion thereof) shall make no refund but shall apply the entire amount against the tax due and shall collect any additional tax due or, within 90 days, shall make a report of the amount of the tax remaining uncollected, together with the name and address of the person who sought the refund. The report shall be made to the Commissioner, and a copy of the report shall be furnished to the person presenting the unused ticket or order for redemption.

(b) Return of tax. Any person who has made a collection of tax in accordance with the preceding paragraph shall include such amount in his regular return of taxes required to be collected under section 4291 of the Code.

(c) Example. A carrier receives for redemption a ticket purchased in the United States for transportation from Calgary, Canada, to Edmonton, Canada, which the purchaser bought for use in conjunction with a ticket for nonstop transportation from Seattle to Calgary. The person applying for the refund does not establish to the satisfaction of the carrier that the tax on the Seattle-Calgary ticket has been paid or that the Seattle-Calgary ticket has been redeemed. The carrier, before making any refund for the unused ticket, is required to deduct from the amount otherwise refundable the tax applicable to the amount paid by the purchaser for the transportation from Seattle to Calgary and to report the tax so collected in its quarterly return of Form 720. In the event that the redemption value of the unused Calgary to Edmonton ticket is less than the amount of the tax due on the amount paid for the transportation from Seattle to Calgary, the carrier should not make any refund but should apply against the outstanding tax the entire amount refundable and should either collect the balance of the tax due or make a report, within 90 days, to the Commissioner, setting forth the name and address of the person seeking the refund and the amount of the tax remaining uncollected.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4263-3 - Special rule for the payment of tax.

(a) In general. For the rules applicable under section 4263(c) of the Internal Revenue Code, see § 49.4261-1(b)(2).

(b) Relationship to other sections. Section 4263(c) and this section are not intended in any way to relieve the person receiving the payment for taxable transportation of persons from his duty under section 4291 of the Code of collecting the tax at the time such payment is received by him.

(c) [Reserved]

(d) Applicability date. This section applies to amounts paid on and after January 19, 2021. For rules that apply before that date, see 26 CFR part 49, revised as of April 1, 2020.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11226, Nov. 14, 1962. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4263-4 - Cross reference.

For the rules applicable under section 4263(d) see § 49.4261-4 relating to payments made within the United States.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4263-5 - Round trips.

(a) In general. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, a round trip shall be considered to consist of two separate trips, i.e., one trip from the point of departure to the destination and a second trip in returning from the destination. A round trip includes certain journeys in which the same routing is not followed on the return trip from the destination to the point of departure as was taken on the going trip (sometimes referred to as “circle trips”). In the case of a cruise or tour (i.e., transportation to no set destination but with one or more intermediate stops en route) the point farthest from the point of departure will be regarded as the destination for purposes of applying the term “round trip”. If a cruise or tour ends at a point other than the one at which it began, the rules of “open jaw” transportation set forth in paragraph (b) of this section apply.

(b) Open jaw transportation. Transportation which qualifies under this paragraph as “open jaw” transportation will be treated in the same manner as a round trip. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, “open jaw” transportation means (1) transportation from the point of departure to a specified destination and return from the specified destination to a point other than the original point of departure, or (2) transportation from the point of departure to a specified destination and return from a point other than the specified destination to the original point of departure, provided that where the points of the open jaw are within the continental United States or the 225-mile zone, the distance between the points of the open jaw does not exceed the distance of the shorter segment traveled. For example, a trip from New York to New Orleans via Panama would be considered as one trip from New York to Panama and separate trip from Panama to New Orleans, since the distance between the points of the open jaw (i.e., New York and New Orleans) is shorter than the distance between Panama and New Orleans (the shorter of the two segments traveled). Both trips would be nontaxable. On the other hand, transportation from New York to Miami via Bermuda does not qualify as “open jaw” transportation (since the points of the open jaw are in the United States and the distance between them is greater than the shorter segment traveled) and therefore would be considered a single trip from New York to Miami and would be taxable.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959. Redesignated by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]

§ 49.4263-6 - Transportation outside the northern portion of the Western Hemisphere.

(a) Transportation which leaves and re-enters the northern portion of the Western Hemisphere. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, transportation, any part of which is outside the northern portion of the Western Hemisphere (as defined in paragraph (c) of this section) shall, if the route of the transportation leaves and re-enters the northern portion of the Western Hemisphere, be considered to consist of transportation to the point outside such northern portion and of separate transportation thereafter. The amount paid for such transportation will be considered to be a payment made for two trips and the taxability of the payment will be determined accordingly. Thus, an amount paid for transportation from New York to San Francisco with a stop at Caracas, Venezuela, will be considered an amount paid for a trip from New York to Caracas and for a separate trip from Caracas to San Francisco, neither of which is taxable transportation.

(b) [Reserved]

(c) Northern portion of the Western Hemisphere. For purposes of the regulations in this subpart, the term “northern portion of the Western Hemisphere” means the area lying west of the 30th meridian west of Greenwich, east of the International Date Line, and north of the equator, but not including any country of South America.

[T.D. 6430, 24 FR 9665, Dec. 3, 1959, as amended by T.D. 6618, 27 FR 11227, Nov. 14, 1962. Redesignated and amended by T.D. 9948, 86 FR 5007, Jan. 19, 2021]