U.S. Code of Federal Regulations

Regulations most recently checked for updates: Oct 20, 2019

§ 2091.3-1 - Segregation.

(a) If a proposal is made to exchange public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management or lands reserved from the public domain for National Forest System purposes, such lands may be segregated by a notation on the public land records for a period not to exceed 5 years from the date of notation (See 43 CFR 2201.1-2 and 36 CFR 254.6).

(b) The filing of an application for lands for selection by a State (exclusive of Alaska) segregates the lands included in the application for a period of 2 years from the date the application is filed. (See subparts 2621 and 2622)

(c) The filing of an application and publication of the notice of the filing of an application in the Federal Register for the purchase of Federally-owned mineral interests under section 209 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1719) segregates the lands for a period of 2 years from the date of the publication of the notice of filing of the application with the authorized officer. (See part 2720)

(d) The filing of an application for an airport lease under the Act of May 24, 1928, as amended (49 U.S.C. Appendix 211-213), or the filing of a request for an airport conveyance under the Airport and Airway Improvement Act of 1982 (49 U.S.C. 2215), segregates the lands as of the date of filing with the authorized officer. (See part 2640 and subpart 2911)

(e)(1) The Bureau of Land Management may segregate, if it finds it necessary for the orderly administration of the public lands, lands included in a right-of-way application under 43 CFR subpart 2804 for the generation of electrical energy from wind or solar sources. In addition, the Bureau of Land Management may also segregate lands that it identifies for potential rights-of-way for electricity generation from wind or solar sources when initiating a competitive process for solar or wind development on particular lands. Upon segregation, such lands will not be subject to appropriation under the public land laws, including location under the Mining Law of 1872, (30 U.S.C. 22 et seq.), but would remain open under the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. 181 et seq.) or the Materials Act of 1947 (30 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). The BLM will effect a segregation by publishing a Federal Register notice that includes a description of the lands being segregated. The BLM may effect segregation in this way for both pending and new right-of-way applications.

(2) The effective date of segregation is the date of publication of the notice in the Federal Register. The segregation terminates consistent with subpart 2091.3-2 and the lands automatically open on the date that is the earliest of the following:

(i) When the BLM issues a decision granting, granting with modifications, or denying the application for a right-of-way;

(ii) Automatically at the end of the segregation period stated in the Federal Register notice initiating the segregation, or

(iii) Upon publication of a Federal Register notice terminating the segregation and opening the lands in question.

(3) The segregation period may not exceed 2 years from the date of publication in the Federal Register of the notice initiating the segregation, unless the State Director determines and documents in writing, prior to the expiration of the segregation period, that an extension is necessary for the orderly administration of the public lands. If the State Director determines an extension is necessary, the Bureau of Land Management will extend the segregation for up to 2 years by publishing a notice in the Federal Register, prior to the expiration of the initial segregation period. Segregations under this part may only be extended once and the total segregation period may not exceed 4 years.

[52 FR 12175, Apr. 15, 1987; 52 FR 13563, Apr. 23, 1987, as amended at 58 FR 60917, Nov. 18, 1993; 76 FR 23204, Apr. 26, 2011; 78 FR 25212, Apr. 30, 2013]