United States Code

USC most recently checked for updates: Dec 08, 2019

§ 4001.
Congressional findings and declaration of purpose
(a)
The Congress finds that—
(1)
United States exports are responsible for creating and maintaining one out of every nine manufacturing jobs in the United States and for generating one out of every seven dollars of total United States goods produced;
(2)
the rapidly growing service-related industries are vital to the well-being of the United States economy inasmuch as they create jobs for seven out of every ten Americans, provide 65 per centum of the Nation’s gross national product, and offer the greatest potential for significantly increased industrial trade involving finished products;
(3)
trade deficits contribute to the decline of the dollar on international currency markets and have an inflationary impact on the United States economy;
(4)
tens of thousands of small- and medium-sized United States businesses produce exportable goods or services but do not engage in exporting;
(5)
although the United States is the world’s leading agricultural exporting nation, many farm products are not marketed as widely and effectively abroad as they could be through export trading companies;
(6)
export trade services in the United States are fragmented into a multitude of separate functions, and companies attempting to offer export trade services lack financial leverage to reach a significant number of potential United States exporters;
(7)
the United States needs well-developed export trade intermediaries which can achieve economies of scale and acquire expertise enabling them to export goods and services profitably, at low per unit cost to producers;
(8)
the development of export trading companies in the United States has been hampered by business attitudes and by Government regulations;
(9)
those activities of State and local governmental authorities which initiate, facilitate, or expand exports of goods and services can be an important source for expansion of total United States exports, as well as for experimentation in the development of innovative export programs keyed to local, State, and regional economic needs;
(10)
if United States trading companies are to be successful in promoting United States exports and in competing with foreign trading companies, they should be able to draw on the resources, expertise, and knowledge of the United States banking system, both in the United States and abroad; and
(11)
the Department of Commerce is responsible for the development and promotion of United States exports, and especially for facilitating the export of finished products by United States manufacturers.
(b)
It is the purpose of this chapter to increase United States exports of products and services by encouraging more efficient provision of export trade services to United States producers and suppliers, in particular by establishing an office within the Department of Commerce to promote the formation of export trade associations and export trading companies, by permitting bank holding companies, bankers’ banks, and Edge Act corporations and agreement corporations that are subsidiaries of bank holding companies to invest in export trading companies, by reducing restrictions on trade financing provided by financial institutions, and by modifying the application of the antitrust laws to certain export trade.
(Pub. L. 97–290, title I, § 102, Oct. 8, 1982, 96 Stat. 1233.)
cite as: 15 USC 4001