United States Code

USC most recently checked for updates: Feb 27, 2020

§ 2703.
Eligible articles
(a)
Growth, product, or manufacture of beneficiary countries
(1)
Unless otherwise excluded from eligibility by this chapter, and subject to section 423 of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, and except as provided in subsection (b)(2) and (3), the duty-free treatment provided under this chapter shall apply to any article which is the growth, product, or manufacture of a beneficiary country if—
(A)
that article is imported directly from a beneficiary country into the customs territory of the United States; and
(B)
the sum of (i) the cost or value of the materials produced in a beneficiary country or two or more beneficiary countries, plus (ii) the direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries is not less than 35 per centum of the appraised value of such article at the time it is entered.
For purposes of determining the percentage referred to in subparagraph (B), the term “beneficiary country” includes the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, and any former beneficiary country. If the cost or value of materials produced in the customs territory of the United States (other than the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico) is included with respect to an article to which this paragraph applies, an amount not to exceed 15 per centum of the appraised value of the article at the time it is entered that is attributed to such United States cost or value may be applied toward determining the percentage referred to in subparagraph (B).
(2)
The Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out this subsection including, but not limited to, regulations providing that, in order to be eligible for duty-free treatment under this chapter, an article must be wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of a beneficiary country, or must be a new or different article of commerce which has been grown, produced, or manufactured in the beneficiary country; but no article or material of a beneficiary country shall be eligible for such treatment by virtue of having merely undergone—
(A)
simple combining or packaging operations, or
(B)
mere dilution with water or mere dilution with another substance that does not materially alter the characteristics of the article.
(3)
As used in this subsection, the phrase “direct costs of processing operations” includes, but is not limited to—
(A)
all actual labor costs involved in the growth, production, manufacture, or assembly of the specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training and the cost of engineering, supervisory, quality control, and similar personnel; and
(B)
dies, molds, tooling, and depreciation on machinery and equipment which are allocable to the specific merchandise.
Such phrase does not include costs which are not directly attributable to the merchandise concerned or are not costs of manufacturing the product, such as (i) profit, and (ii) general expenses of doing business which are either not allocable to the specific merchandise or are not related to the growth, production, manufacture, or assembly of the merchandise, such as administrative salaries, casualty and liability insurance, advertising, and salesmen’s salaries, commissions or expenses.
(4)
Notwithstanding section 1311 of this title, the products of a beneficiary country which are imported directly from any beneficiary country into Puerto Rico may be entered under bond for processing or use in manufacturing in Puerto Rico. No duty shall be imposed on the withdrawal from warehouse of the product of such processing or manufacturing if, at the time of such withdrawal, such product meets the requirements of paragraph (1)(B).
(5)
The duty-free treatment provided under this chapter shall apply to an article (other than an article listed in subsection (b)) which is the growth, product, or manufacture of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico if—
(A)
the article is imported directly from the beneficiary country into the customs territory of the United States,
(B)
the article was by any means advanced in value or improved in condition in a beneficiary country, and
(C)
if any materials are added to the article in a beneficiary country, such materials are a product of a beneficiary country or the United States.
(6)
Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the duty-free treatment provided under this chapter shall apply to liqueurs and spirituous beverages produced in the territory of Canada from rum if—
(A)
such rum is the growth, product, or manufacture of a beneficiary country or of the Virgin Islands of the United States;
(B)
such rum is imported directly from a beneficiary country or the Virgin Islands of the United States into the territory of Canada, and such liqueurs and spirituous beverages are imported directly from the territory of Canada into the customs territory of the United States;
(C)
when imported into the customs territory of the United States, such liqueurs and spirituous beverages are classified in subheading 2208.90 or 2208.40 of the HTS; and
(D)
such rum accounts for at least 90 percent by volume of the alcoholic content of such liqueurs and spirituous beverages.
(b)
Import-sensitive articles
(1)
In general
Subject to paragraphs (2) through (5), the duty-free treatment provided under this chapter does not apply to—
(A)
textile and apparel articles which were not eligible articles for purposes of this chapter on January 1, 1994, as this chapter was in effect on that date;
(B)
footwear provided for in any of subheadings 6401.10.00, 6401.91.00, 6401.92.90, 6401.99.30, 6401.99.60, 6401.99.90, 6402.30.50, 6402.30.70, 6402.30.80, 6402.91.50, 6402.91.80, 6402.91.90, 6402.99.20, 6402.99.80, 6402.99.90, 6403.59.60, 6403.91.30, 6403.99.60, 6403.99.90, 6404.11.90, and 6404.19.20 of the HTS that was not designated at the time of the effective date of this chapter [Aug. 5, 1983] as eligible articles for the purpose of the generalized system of preferences under title V of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2461 et seq.];
(C)
tuna, prepared or preserved in any manner, in airtight containers;
(D)
petroleum, or any product derived from petroleum, provided for in headings 2709 and 2710 of the HTS;
(E)
watches and watch parts (including cases, bracelets, and straps), of whatever type including, but not limited to, mechanical, quartz digital or quartz analog, if such watches or watch parts contain any material which is the product of any country with respect to which HTS column 2 rates of duty apply; or
(F)
articles to which reduced rates of duty apply under subsection (h).
(2)
Transition period treatment of certain textile and apparel articles
(A)
Articles covered
During the transition period, the preferential treatment described in subparagraph (B) shall apply to the following articles:
(i)
Apparel articles assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries
Apparel articles sewn or otherwise assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from fabrics wholly formed and cut, or from components knit-to-shape, in the United States from yarns wholly formed in the United States, or both (including fabrics not formed from yarns, if such fabrics are classifiable under heading 5602 or 5603 of the HTS and are wholly formed and cut in the United States) that are—
(I)
entered under subheading 9802.00.80 of the HTS; or
(II)
entered under chapter 61 or 62 of the HTS, if, after such assembly, the articles would have qualified for entry under subheading 9802.00.80 of the HTS but for the fact that the articles were embroidered or subjected to stone-washing, enzyme-washing, acid washing, perma-pressing, oven-baking, bleaching, garment-dyeing, screen printing, or other similar processes.
 Apparel articles entered on or after September 1, 2002, shall qualify under the preceding sentence only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are knit fabrics, is carried out in the United States. Apparel articles entered on or after September 1, 2002, shall qualify under the first sentence of this clause only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are woven fabrics, is carried out in the United States.
(ii)
Other apparel articles assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries

Apparel articles sewn or otherwise assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries with thread formed in the United States from fabrics wholly formed in the United States and cut in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from yarns wholly formed in the United States, or from components knit-to-shape in the United States from yarns wholly formed in the United States, or both (including fabrics not formed from yarns, if such fabrics are classifiable under heading 5602 or 5603 of the HTS and are wholly formed in the United States). Apparel articles entered on or after September 1, 2002, shall qualify under the preceding sentence only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are knit fabrics, is carried out in the United States. Apparel articles entered on or after September 1, 2002, shall qualify under the first sentence of this clause only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are woven fabrics, is carried out in the United States.

(iii)
Certain knit apparel articles
(I)
Apparel articles knit to shape (other than socks provided for in heading 6115 of the HTS) in a CBTPA beneficiary country from yarns wholly formed in the United States, and knit apparel articles (other than t-shirts described in subclause (III)) cut and wholly assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from fabric formed in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries or the United States from yarns wholly formed in the United States (including fabrics not formed from yarns, if such fabrics are classifiable under heading 5602 or 5603 of the HTS and are formed in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries), in an amount not exceeding the amount set forth in subclause (II).
(II)
The amount referred to in subclause (I) is as follows:
(aa)
500,000,000 square meter equivalents during the 1-year period beginning on October 1, 2002.
(bb)
850,000,000 square meter equivalents during the 1-year period beginning on October 1, 2003.
(cc)
970,000,000 square meter equivalents in each succeeding 1-year period through September 30, 2020.
(III)
T-shirts, other than underwear, classifiable under subheadings 6109.10.00 and 6109.90.10 of the HTS, made in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from fabric formed in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from yarns wholly formed in the United States, in an amount not exceeding the amount set forth in subclause (IV).
(IV)
The amount referred to in subclause (III) is as follows:
(aa)
4,872,000 dozen during the 1-year period beginning on October 1, 2001.
(bb)
9,000,000 dozen during the 1-year period beginning on October 1, 2002.
(cc)
10,000,000 dozen during the 1-year period beginning on October 1, 2003.
(dd)
12,000,000 dozen in each succeeding 1-year period through September 30, 2020.
(V)
It is the sense of the Congress that the Congress should determine, based on the record of expansion of exports from the United States as a result of the preferential treatment of articles under this clause, the percentage by which the amount provided in subclauses (II) and (IV) should be compounded for the 1-year periods occurring after the 1-year period ending on September 30, 2004.
(iv)
Certain other apparel articles
(I)
General rule

Subject to subclause (II), any apparel article classifiable under subheading 6212.10 of the HTS, except for articles entered under clause (i), (ii), (iii), (v), or (vi), if the article is both cut and sewn or otherwise assembled in the United States, or one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries, or both.

(II)
Limitation

During the 1-year period beginning on October 1, 2001, and during each of the 18 succeeding 1-year periods, apparel articles described in subclause (I) of a producer or an entity controlling production shall be eligible for preferential treatment under subparagraph (B) only if the aggregate cost of fabrics (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) formed in the United States that are used in the production of all such articles of that producer or entity that are entered and eligible under this clause during the preceding 1-year period is at least 75 percent of the aggregate declared customs value of the fabric (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) contained in all such articles of that producer or entity that are entered and eligible under this clause during the preceding 1-year period.

(III)
Development of procedure to ensure compliance

The United States Customs Service shall develop and implement methods and procedures to ensure ongoing compliance with the requirement set forth in subclause (II). If the Customs Service finds that a producer or an entity controlling production has not satisfied such requirement in a 1-year period, then apparel articles described in subclause (I) of that producer or entity shall be ineligible for preferential treatment under subparagraph (B) during any succeeding 1-year period until the aggregate cost of fabrics (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) formed in the United States that are used in the production of such articles of that producer or entity entered during the preceding 1-year period is at least 85 percent of the aggregate declared customs value of the fabric (exclusive of all findings and trimmings) contained in all such articles of that producer or entity that are entered and eligible under this clause during the preceding 1-year period.

(v)
Apparel articles assembled from fabrics or yarn not widely available in commercial quantities
(I)
Apparel articles that are both cut (or knit-to-shape) and sewn or otherwise assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries, to the extent that apparel articles of such fabrics or yarn would be eligible for preferential treatment, without regard to the source of the fabrics or yarn, under Annex 401 of the NAFTA.
(II)
At the request of any interested party, the President is authorized to proclaim additional fabrics and yarn as eligible for preferential treatment under subclause (I) if—
(aa)
the President determines that such fabrics or yarn cannot be supplied by the domestic industry in commercial quantities in a timely manner;
(bb)
the President has obtained advice regarding the proposed action from the appropriate advisory committee established under section 135 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2155) and the United States International Trade Commission;
(cc)
within 60 days after the request, the President has submitted a report to the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Finance of the Senate that sets forth the action proposed to be proclaimed and the reasons for such actions, and the advice obtained under division (bb);
(dd)
a period of 60 calendar days, beginning with the first day on which the President has met the requirements of division (cc), has expired; and
(ee)
the President has consulted with such committees regarding the proposed action during the period referred to in division (cc).
(III)
If the President determines that any fabric or yarn was determined to be eligible for preferential treatment under subclause (I) on the basis of fraud, the President is authorized to remove that designation from that fabric or yarn with respect to articles entered after such removal.
(vi)
Handloomed, handmade, and folklore articles

A handloomed, handmade, or folklore article of a CBTPA beneficiary country identified under subparagraph (C) that is certified as such by the competent authority of such beneficiary country.

(vii)
Special rules
(I)
Exception for findings and trimmings
(aa)
(bb)
In the case of an article described in clause (ii) of this subparagraph, sewing thread shall not be treated as findings or trimmings under this subclause.
(II)
Certain interlining
(aa)
An article otherwise eligible for preferential treatment under this paragraph shall not be ineligible for such treatment because the article contains certain interlinings of foreign origin, if the value of such interlinings (and any findings and trimmings) does not exceed 25 percent of the cost of the components of the assembled article.
(bb)
Interlinings eligible for the treatment described in division (aa) include only a chest type plate, “hymo” piece, or “sleeve header”, of woven or weft-inserted warp knit construction and of coarse animal hair or man-made filaments.
(cc)
The treatment described in this subclause shall terminate if the President makes a determination that United States manufacturers are producing such interlinings in the United States in commercial quantities.
(III)
De minimis rule

An article that would otherwise be ineligible for preferential treatment under this paragraph because the article contains fibers or yarns not wholly formed in the United States or in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries shall not be ineligible for such treatment if the total weight of all such fibers or yarns is not more than 7 percent of the total weight of the good. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, an apparel article containing elastomeric yarns shall be eligible for preferential treatment under this paragraph only if such yarns are wholly formed in the United States.

(IV)
Special origin rule

An article otherwise eligible for preferential treatment under clause (i), (ii), or (ix) of this subparagraph shall not be ineligible for such treatment because the article contains nylon filament yarn (other than elastomeric yarn) that is classifiable under subheading 5402.10.30, 5402.10.60, 5402.31.30, 5402.31.60, 5402.32.30, 5402.32.60, 5402.41.10, 5402.41.90, 5402.51.00, or 5402.61.00 of the HTS duty-free from a country that is a party to an agreement with the United States establishing a free trade area, which entered into force before January 1, 1995.

(V)
Thread

An article otherwise eligible for preferential treatment under this paragraph shall not be ineligible for such treatment because the thread used to assemble the article is dyed, printed, or finished in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries.

(viii)
Textile luggage
Textile luggage—
(I)
assembled in a CBTPA beneficiary country from fabric wholly formed and cut in the United States, from yarns wholly formed in the United States, that is entered under subheading 9802.00.80 of the HTS; or
(II)
assembled from fabric cut in a CBTPA beneficiary country from fabric wholly formed in the United States from yarns wholly formed in the United States.
(ix)
Apparel articles assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from United States and CBTPA beneficiary country components

Apparel articles sewn or otherwise assembled in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries with thread formed in the United States from components cut in the United States and in one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from fabric wholly formed in the United States from yarns wholly formed in the United States, or from components knit-to-shape in the United States and one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries from yarns wholly formed in the United States, or both (including fabrics not formed from yarns, if such fabrics are classifiable under heading 5602 or 5603 of the HTS). Apparel articles shall qualify under this clause only if they meet the requirements of clause (i) or (ii) (as the case may be) with respect to dyeing, printing, and finishing of knit and woven fabrics from which the articles are assembled.

(B)
Preferential treatment

Except as provided in subparagraph (E), during the transition period, the articles to which this subparagraph applies shall enter the United States free of duty and free of any quantitative restrictions, limitations, or consultation levels.

(C)
Handloomed, handmade, and folklore articles

For purposes of subparagraph (A)(vi), the President shall consult with representatives of the CBTPA beneficiary countries concerned for the purpose of identifying particular textile and apparel goods that are mutually agreed upon as being handloomed, handmade, or folklore goods of a kind described in section 2.3(a), (b), or (c) of the Annex or Appendix 3.1.B.11 of the Annex.

(D)
Penalties for transshipments
(i)
Penalties for exporters

If the President determines, based on sufficient evidence, that an exporter has engaged in transshipment with respect to textile or apparel articles from a CBTPA beneficiary country, then the President shall deny all benefits under this chapter to such exporter, and any successor of such exporter, for a period of 2 years.

(ii)
Penalties for countries

Whenever the President finds, based on sufficient evidence, that transshipment has occurred, the President shall request that the CBTPA beneficiary country or countries through whose territory the transshipment has occurred take all necessary and appropriate actions to prevent such transshipment. If the President determines that a country is not taking such actions, the President shall reduce the quantities of textile and apparel articles that may be imported into the United States from such country by the quantity of the transshipped articles multiplied by 3, to the extent consistent with the obligations of the United States under the WTO.

(iii)
Transshipment described

Transshipment within the meaning of this subparagraph has occurred when preferential treatment under subparagraph (B) has been claimed for a textile or apparel article on the basis of material false information concerning the country of origin, manufacture, processing, or assembly of the article or any of its components. For purposes of this clause, false information is material if disclosure of the true information would mean or would have meant that the article is or was ineligible for preferential treatment under subparagraph (B).

(E)
Bilateral emergency actions
(i)
In general

The President may take bilateral emergency tariff actions of a kind described in section 4 of the Annex with respect to any apparel article imported from a CBTPA beneficiary country if the application of tariff treatment under subparagraph (B) to such article results in conditions that would be cause for the taking of such actions under such section 4 with respect to a like article described in the same 8-digit subheading of the HTS that is imported from Mexico.

(ii)
Rules relating to bilateral emergency action
For purposes of applying bilateral emergency action under this subparagraph—
(I)
the requirements of paragraph (5) of section 4 of the Annex (relating to providing compensation) shall not apply;
(II)
the term “transition period” in section 4 of the Annex shall have the meaning given that term in paragraph (5)(D) of this subsection; and
(III)
the requirements to consult specified in section 4 of the Annex shall be treated as satisfied if the President requests consultations with the CBTPA beneficiary country in question and the country does not agree to consult within the time period specified under section 4.
(3)
Transition period treatment of certain other articles originating in beneficiary countries
(A)
Equivalent tariff treatment
(i)
In general

Subject to clauses (ii) and (iii), the tariff treatment accorded at any time during the transition period to any article referred to in any of subparagraphs (B) through (F) of paragraph (1) that is a CBTPA originating good shall be identical to the tariff treatment that is accorded at such time under Annex 302.2 of the NAFTA to an article described in the same 8-digit subheading of the HTS that is a good of Mexico and is imported into the United States.

(ii)
Exception

Clause (i) does not apply to any article accorded duty-free treatment under U.S. Note 2(b) to subchapter II of chapter 98 of the HTS.

(iii)
Certain footwear
Notwithstanding paragraph (1)(B) and clause (i) of this subparagraph, footwear provided for in any of subheadings 6403.59.60, 6403.91.30, 6403.99.60, and 6403.99.90 of the HTS shall be eligible for the duty-free treatment provided for under this chapter if—
(I)
the article of footwear is the growth, product, or manufacture of a CBTPA beneficiary country; and
(II)
the article otherwise meets the requirements of subsection (a), except that in applying such subsection, “CBTPA beneficiary country” shall be substituted for “beneficiary country” each place it appears.
(B)
Relationship to subsection (h) duty reductions

If at any time during the transition period the rate of duty that would (but for action taken under subparagraph (A)(i) in regard to such period) apply with respect to any article under subsection (h) is a rate of duty that is lower than the rate of duty resulting from such action, then such lower rate of duty shall be applied for the purposes of implementing such action.

(4)
Customs procedures
(A)
In general
(i)
Regulations

Any importer that claims preferential treatment under paragraph (2) or (3) shall comply with customs procedures similar in all material respects to the requirements of Article 502(1) of the NAFTA as implemented pursuant to United States law, in accordance with regulations promulgated by the Secretary of the Treasury.

(ii)
Determination
(I)
In general
In order to qualify for the preferential treatment under paragraph (2) or (3) and for a Certificate of Origin to be valid with respect to any article for which such treatment is claimed, there shall be in effect a determination by the President that each country described in subclause (II)—
(aa)
has implemented and follows; or
(bb)
is making substantial progress toward implementing and following,
  procedures and requirements similar in all material respects to the relevant procedures and requirements under chapter 5 of the NAFTA.
(II)
Country described
A country is described in this subclause if it is a CBTPA beneficiary country—
(aa)
from which the article is exported; or
(bb)
in which materials used in the production of the article originate or in which the article or such materials undergo production that contributes to a claim that the article is eligible for preferential treatment under paragraph (2) or (3).
(B)
Certificate of origin

The Certificate of Origin that otherwise would be required pursuant to the provisions of subparagraph (A) shall not be required in the case of an article imported under paragraph (2) or (3) if such Certificate of Origin would not be required under Article 503 of the NAFTA (as implemented pursuant to United States law), if the article were imported from Mexico.

(C)
Report by USTR on cooperation of other countries concerning circumvention
The United States Commissioner of Customs shall conduct a study analyzing the extent to which each CBTPA beneficiary country—
(i)
has cooperated fully with the United States, consistent with its domestic laws and procedures, in instances of circumvention or alleged circumvention of existing quotas on imports of textile and apparel goods, to establish necessary relevant facts in the places of import, export, and, where applicable, transshipment, including investigation of circumvention practices, exchanges of documents, correspondence, reports, and other relevant information, to the extent such information is available;
(ii)
has taken appropriate measures, consistent with its domestic laws and procedures, against exporters and importers involved in instances of false declaration concerning fiber content, quantities, description, classification, or origin of textile and apparel goods; and
(iii)
has penalized the individuals and entities involved in any such circumvention, consistent with its domestic laws and procedures, and has worked closely to seek the cooperation of any third country to prevent such circumvention from taking place in that third country.
The Trade Representative shall submit to Congress, not later than October 1, 2001, a report on the study conducted under this subparagraph.
(5)
Definitions and special rules
For purposes of this subsection—
(A)
Annex

The term “the Annex” means Annex 300–B of the NAFTA.

(B)
CBTPA beneficiary country
The term “CBTPA beneficiary country” means any “beneficiary country”, as defined in section 2702(a)(1)(A) of this title, which the President designates as a CBTPA beneficiary country, taking into account the criteria contained in subsections (b) and (c) of section 2702 of this title and other appropriate criteria, including the following:
(i)
Whether the beneficiary country has demonstrated a commitment to—
(I)
undertake its obligations under the WTO, including those agreements listed in section 3511(d) of this title, on or ahead of schedule; and
(II)
participate in negotiations toward the completion of the FTAA or another free trade agreement.
(ii)
The extent to which the country provides protection of intellectual property rights consistent with or greater than the protection afforded under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights described in section 3511(d)(15) of this title.
(iii)
The extent to which the country provides internationally recognized worker rights, including—
(I)
the right of association;
(II)
the right to organize and bargain collectively;
(III)
a prohibition on the use of any form of forced or compulsory labor;
(IV)
a minimum age for the employment of children; and
(V)
acceptable conditions of work with respect to minimum wages, hours of work, and occupational safety and health;
(iv)
Whether the country has implemented its commitments to eliminate the worst forms of child labor, as defined in section 507(6) of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2467(6)].
(v)
The extent to which the country has met the counter-narcotics certification criteria set forth in section 2291j of title 22 for eligibility for United States assistance.
(vi)
The extent to which the country has taken steps to become a party to and implements the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption.
(vii)
The extent to which the country—
(I)
applies transparent, nondiscriminatory, and competitive procedures in government procurement equivalent to those contained in the Agreement on Government Procurement described in section 3511(d)(17) of this title; and
(II)
contributes to efforts in international fora to develop and implement international rules in transparency in government procurement.
(C)
CBTPA originating good
(i)
In general

The term “CBTPA originating good” means a good that meets the rules of origin for a good set forth in chapter 4 of the NAFTA as implemented pursuant to United States law.

(ii)
Application of chapter 4
In applying chapter 4 of the NAFTA with respect to a CBTPA beneficiary country for purposes of this subsection—
(I)
no country other than the United States and a CBTPA beneficiary country may be treated as being a party to the NAFTA;
(II)
any reference to trade between the United States and Mexico shall be deemed to refer to trade between the United States and a CBTPA beneficiary country;
(III)
any reference to a party shall be deemed to refer to a CBTPA beneficiary country or the United States; and
(IV)
any reference to parties shall be deemed to refer to any combination of CBTPA beneficiary countries or to the United States and one or more CBTPA beneficiary countries (or any combination thereof).
(D)
Transition period
The term “transition period” means, with respect to a CBTPA beneficiary country, the period that begins on October 1, 2000, and ends on the earlier of—
(i)
September 30, 2020; or
(ii)
the date on which the FTAA or another free trade agreement that makes substantial progress in achieving the negotiating objectives set forth in section 3317(b)(5) of this title enters into force with respect to the United States and the CBTPA beneficiary country.
(E)
CBTPA

The term “CBTPA” means the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act.

(F)
FTAA

The term “FTAA” means the Free Trade Area of the Americas.

(G)
Former CBTPA beneficiary country

The term “former CBTPA beneficiary country” means a country that ceases to be designated as a CBTPA beneficiary country under this chapter because the country has become a party to a free trade agreement with the United States.

(H)
Articles that undergo production in a CBTPA beneficiary country and a former CBTPA beneficiary country
(i)
For purposes of determining the eligibility of an article for preferential treatment under paragraph (2) or (3), references in either such paragraph, and in subparagraph (C) of this paragraph to—
(I)
a “CBTPA beneficiary country” shall be considered to include any former CBTPA beneficiary country, and
(II)
“CBTPA beneficiary countries” shall be considered to include former CBTPA beneficiary countries,
if the article, or a good used in the production of the article, undergoes production in a CBTPA beneficiary country.
(ii)
An article that is eligible for preferential treatment under clause (i) shall not be ineligible for such treatment because the article is imported directly from a former CBTPA beneficiary country.
(iii)
Notwithstanding clauses (i) and (ii), an article that is a good of a former CBTPA beneficiary country for purposes of section 1304 of this title or section 3592 of this title, as the case may be, shall not be eligible for preferential treatment under paragraph (2) or (3), unless—
(I)
it is an article that is a good of the Dominican Republic under either such section 1304 or 3592 of this title; and
(II)
the article, or a good used in the production of the article, undergoes production in Haiti.
(c)
Sugar and beef products; stable food production plan; suspension of duty-free treatment; monitoring
(1)
As used in this subsection—
(A)
The term “sugar and beef products” means—
(i)
sugars, sirups, and molasses provided for in subheadings 1701.11.00, 1701.12.00, 1701.91.20, 1701.99.00, 1702.90.30, 1806.10.40, and 2106.90.10 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, and
(ii)
articles of beef or veal, however provided for in chapters 2 and 16 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States.
(B)
The term “Plan” means a stable food production plan that consists of measures and proposals designed to ensure that the present level of food production in, and the nutritional level of the population of, a beneficiary country will not be adversely affected by changes in land use and land ownership that will result if increased production of sugar and beef products is undertaken in response to the duty-free treatment extended under this chapter to such products. A Plan must specify such facts regarding, and such proposed actions by, a beneficiary country as the President deems necessary for purposes of carrying out this subsection, including but not limited to—
(i)
the current levels of food production and nutritional health of the population;
(ii)
current level of production and export of sugar and beef products;
(iii)
expected increases in production and export of sugar and beef products as a result of the duty-free access to the United States market provided under this chapter;
(iv)
measures to be taken to ensure that the expanded production of those products because of such duty-free access will not occur at the expense of stable food production; and
(v)
proposals for a system to monitor the impact of such duty-free access on stable food production and land use and land ownership patterns.
(2)
Duty-free treatment extended under this chapter to sugar and beef products that are the product of a beneficiary country shall be suspended by the President under this subsection if—
(A)
the beneficiary country, within the ninety-day period beginning on the date of its designation as such a country under section 2702 of this title, does not submit a Plan to the President for evaluation;
(B)
on the basis of his evaluation, the President determines that the Plan of a beneficiary country does not meet the criteria set forth in paragraph (1)(B); or
(C)
as a result of the monitoring of the operation of the Plan under paragraph (5), the President determines that a beneficiary country is not making a good faith effort to implement its Plan, or that the measures and proposals in the Plan, although being implemented, are not achieving their purposes.
(3)
Before the President suspends duty-free treatment by reason of paragraph (2)(A), (B), or (C) to the sugar and beef products of a beneficiary country, he must offer to enter into consultation with the beneficiary country for purposes of formulating appropriate remedial action which may be taken by that country to avoid such suspension. If the beneficiary country thereafter enters into consultation within a reasonable time and undertakes to formulate remedial action in good faith, the President shall withhold the suspension of duty-free treatment on the condition that the remedial action agreed upon be appropriately implemented by that country.
(4)
The President shall monitor on a biennial basis the operation of the Plans implemented by beneficiary countries, and shall submit a written report to Congress by March 15 following the close of each biennium, that—
(A)
specifies the extent to which each Plan, and remedial actions, if any, agreed upon under paragraph (4), have been implemented; and
(B)
evaluates the results of such implementation.
(5)
The President shall terminate any suspension of duty-free treatment imposed under this subsection if he determines that the beneficiary country has taken appropriate action to remedy the factors on which the suspension was based.
(d)
Tariff-rate quotas

No quantity of an agricultural product subject to a tariff-rate quota that exceeds the in-quota quantity shall be eligible for duty-free treatment under this chapter.

(e)
Proclamations suspending duty-free treatment
(1)
The President may by proclamation suspend the duty-free treatment provided by this chapter with respect to any eligible article and may proclaim a duty rate for such article if such action is provided under chapter 1 of title II of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2251 et seq.] or section 1862 of this title.
(2)
In any report by the International Trade Commission to the President under section 202(f) of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2252(f)] regarding any article for which duty-free treatment has been proclaimed by the President pursuant to this chapter, the Commission shall state whether and to what extent its findings and recommendations apply to such article when imported from beneficiary countries.
(3)
For purposes of subsections 1
1
 So in original.
section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2253(a), (c)], the suspension of the duty-free treatment provided by this chapter shall be treated as an increase in duty.
(4)
No proclamation which provides solely for a suspension referred to in paragraph (3) of this subsection with respect to any article shall be taken under section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2253] unless the United States International Trade Commission, in addition to making an affirmative determination with respect to such article under section 202(b) of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2252(b)], determines in the course of its investigation under such section that the serious injury (or threat thereof) substantially caused by imports to the domestic industry producing a like or directly competitive article results from the duty-free treatment provided by this chapter.
(5)
(A)
Any action taken under section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2253] that is in effect when duty-free treatment pursuant to section 2701 2
2
 See References in Text note below.
of this title is proclaimed shall remain in effect until modified or terminated.
(B)
If any article is subject to any such action at the time duty-free treatment is proclaimed pursuant to section 2701 of this title, the President may reduce or terminate the application of such action to the importation of such article from beneficiary countries prior to the otherwise scheduled date on which such reduction or termination would occur pursuant to the criteria and procedures of section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2253].
(f)
Petitions to International Trade Commission
(1)
If a petition is filed with the International Trade Commission pursuant to the provisions of section 201 of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2251] regarding a perishable product and alleging injury from imports from beneficiary countries, then the petition may also be filed with the Secretary of Agriculture with a request that emergency relief be granted pursuant to paragraph (3) of this subsection with respect to such article.
(2)
Within fourteen days after the filing of a petition under paragraph (1) of this subsection—
(A)
if the Secretary of Agriculture has reason to believe that a perishable product from a beneficiary country is being imported into the United States in such increased quantities as to be a substantial cause of serious injury, or the threat thereof, to the domestic industry producing a perishable product like or directly competitive with the imported product and that emergency action is warranted, he shall advise the President and recommend that the President take emergency action; or
(B)
the Secretary of Agriculture shall publish a notice of his determination not to recommend the imposition of emergency action and so advise the petitioner.
(3)
Within seven days after the President receives a recommendation from the Secretary of Agriculture to take emergency action pursuant to paragraph (2) of this subsection, he shall issue a proclamation withdrawing the duty-free treatment provided by this chapter or publish a notice of his determination not to take emergency action.
(4)
The emergency action provided by paragraph (3) of this subsection shall cease to apply—
(A)
upon the taking of action under section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2253],
(B)
on the day a determination by the President not to take action 1 under section 203 of such Act [19 U.S.C. 2253] not to take action 1 becomes final,
(C)
in the event of a report of the United States International Trade Commission containing a negative finding, on the day the Commission’s report is submitted to the President, or
(D)
whenever the President determines that because of changed circumstances such relief is no longer warranted.
(5)
For purposes of this subsection, the term “perishable product” means—
(A)
live plants and fresh cut flowers provided for in chapter 6 of the HTS;
(B)
fresh or chilled vegetables provided for in headings 0701 through 0709 (except subheading 0709.52.00) and heading 0714 of the HTS;
(C)
fresh fruit provided for in subheadings 0804.20 through 0810.90 (except citrons of subheading 0805.90.00, tamarinds and kiwi fruit of subheading 0810.90.20, and cashew apples, mameyes colorados, sapodillas, soursops and sweetsops of subheading 0810.90.40) of the HTS; and
(D)
concentrated citrus fruit juice provided for in subheadings 2009.11.00, 2009.19.40, 2009.20.40, 2009.30.20, and 2009.30.60 of the HTS.
(g)
Fees not affected by proclamation

No proclamation issued pursuant to this chapter shall affect fees imposed pursuant to section 624 of title 7.

(h)
Duty reduction for certain leather-related products
(1)
Subject to paragraph (2), the President shall proclaim reductions in the rates of duty on handbags, luggage, flat goods, work gloves, and leather wearing apparel that—
(A)
are the product of any beneficiary country; and
(B)
were not designated on August 5, 1983, as eligible articles for purposes of the generalized system of preferences under title V of the Trade Act of 1974 [19 U.S.C. 2461 et seq.].
(2)
The reduction required under paragraph (1) in the rate of duty on any article shall—
(A)
result in a rate that is equal to 80 percent of the rate of duty that applies to the article on December 31, 1991, except that, subject to the limitations in paragraph (3), the reduction may not exceed 2.5 percent ad valorem; and
(B)
be implemented in 5 equal annual stages with the first one-fifth of the aggregate reduction in the rate of duty being applied to entries, or withdrawals from warehouse for consumption, of the article on or after January 1, 1992.
(3)
The reduction required under this subsection with respect to the rate of duty on any article is in addition to any reduction in the rate of duty on that article that may be proclaimed by the President as being required or appropriate to carry out any trade agreement entered into under the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations; except that if the reduction so proclaimed—
(A)
is less than 1.5 percent ad valorem, the aggregate of such proclaimed reduction and the reduction under this subsection may not exceed 3.5 percent ad valorem, or
(B)
is 1.5 percent ad valorem or greater, the aggregate of such proclaimed reduction and the reduction under this subsection may not exceed the proclaimed reduction plus 1 percent ad valorem.
(Pub. L. 98–67, title II, § 213, Aug. 5, 1983, 97 Stat. 387; Pub. L. 98–573, title II, § 235, Oct. 30, 1984, 98 Stat. 2992; Pub. L. 99–514, title IV, § 423(f)(2), title XVIII, § 1890, Oct. 22, 1986, 100 Stat. 2232, 2926; Pub. L. 100–418, title I, §§ 1214(q)(2), 1401(b)(2), Aug. 23, 1988, 102 Stat. 1159, 1239; Pub. L. 100–647, title IX, § 9001(a)(14), Nov. 10, 1988, 102 Stat. 3808; Pub. L. 101–382, title II, §§ 212, 215(a), Aug. 20, 1990, 104 Stat. 655, 657; Pub. L. 103–465, title IV, § 404(e)(1), Dec. 8, 1994, 108 Stat. 4961; Pub. L. 106–200, title II, §§ 211(a), (e)(1)(B), 212, May 18, 2000, 114 Stat. 276, 287, 288; Pub. L. 107–206, title III, § 3001[(a)], Aug. 2, 2002, 116 Stat. 909; Pub. L. 107–210, div. C, title XXXI, § 3107(a), Aug. 6, 2002, 116 Stat. 1035; Pub. L. 108–429, title I, § 1558, title II, § 2004(b), Dec. 3, 2004, 118 Stat. 2579, 2592; Pub. L. 109–53, title IV, § 402(c), (d), Aug. 2, 2005, 119 Stat. 496; Pub. L. 109–432, div. D, title V, § 5005(a), Dec. 20, 2006, 120 Stat. 3189; Pub. L. 110–234, title XV, § 15408, May 22, 2008, 122 Stat. 1546; Pub. L. 110–246, § 4(a), title XV, § 15408, June 18, 2008, 122 Stat. 1664, 2308; Pub. L. 111–171, § 3(1), May 24, 2010, 124 Stat. 1195.)
cite as: 19 USC 2703