United States Code

USC most recently checked for updates: Dec 11, 2019

§ 4221.
Depositions and notarial acts; perjury

Every secretary of embassy or legation and consular officer is authorized, whenever he is required or deems it necessary or proper so to do, at the post, port, place, or within the limits of his embassy, legation, or consulate, to administer to or take from any person an oath, affirmation, affidavit, or deposition, and to perform any notarial act which any notary public is required or authorized by law to do within the United States. At any post, port, or place where there is no consular officer, the Secretary of State may authorize any other officer or employee of the United States Government who is a United States citizen serving overseas, including any contract employee of the United States Government, to perform such acts, and any such contractor so authorized shall not be considered to be a consular officer. Every such oath, affirmation, affidavit, deposition, and notarial act administered, sworn, affirmed, taken, had, or done, by or before any such officer, when certified under his hand and seal of office, shall be as valid, and of like force and effect within the United States, to all intents and purposes, as if administered, sworn, affirmed, taken, had, or done, by or before any other person within the United States duly authorized and competent thereto. If any person shall willfully and corruptly commit perjury, or by any means procure any person to commit perjury in any such oath, affirmation, affidavit, or deposition, within the intent and meaning of any Act of Congress now or hereafter made, such offender may be charged, proceeded against, tried, convicted, and dealt with in any district of the United States, in the same manner, in all respects, as if such offense had been committed in the United States, before any officer duly authorized therein to administer or take such oath, affirmation, affidavit, or deposition, and shall be subject to the same punishment and disability therefor as are or shall be prescribed by any such act for such offense; and any document purporting to have affixed, impressed, or subscribed thereto, or thereon the seal and signature of the officer administering or taking the same in testimony thereof, shall be admitted in evidence without proof of any such seal or signature being genuine or of the official character of such person; and if any person shall forge any such seal or signature, or shall tender in evidence any such document with a false or counterfeit seal or signature thereto, knowing the same to be false or counterfeit, he shall be deemed and taken to be guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction shall be imprisoned not exceeding three years nor less than one year, and fined, in a sum not to exceed $3,000, and may be charged, proceeded against, tried, convicted, and dealt with therefor in the district where he may be arrested or in custody. Pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe,

(R.S. § 1750; Apr. 5, 1906, ch. 1366, § 3, 34 Stat. 100; Pub. L. 103–415, § 1(mm)(2), Oct. 25, 1994, 108 Stat. 4304; Pub. L. 105–277, div. G, subdiv. B, title XXII, § 2222(c)(1), Oct. 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 2681–818.)
cite as: 22 USC 4221