1 See References in Text note below.
Any revisions in the existing Guidelines shall be subject to notice and opportunity for comment.
2 So in original. Probably should be “effects”.
of the pollutant or other evidence adequate to support the petition. The Administrator may not deny a petition solely on the basis of inadequate resources or time for review.
3 So in original. Probably should be “section”.
7411 of this title and this section.
4 So in original. Probably should be “Right-To-Know”.
Act of 1986 [
5 So in original. Probably should be paragraph “(7)(B)”.
in preventing accidental releases. The Board may from time to time review and revise its recommendations under this subparagraph.
6 So in original. The word “or” probably should appear.
7 So in original. The word “Administrator” probably should be “Secretary”.
shall indicate whether the Secretary will—
8 So in original. Probably should be “subparagraph”.
(G) and
9 So in original. Probably should be “(i)(II)”.
and examples of actions that would and would not meet that definition, and notice of the restrictions on further dissemination and the penalties established by this chapter to each covered person who receives off-site consequence analysis information under clause (iv) and each covered person who receives off-site consequence analysis information for an official use under the regulations promulgated under clause (ii).
Editorial Notes
References in Text

The date of enactment, referred to in subsec. (a)(11), probably means the date of enactment of Puspan. L. 101–549, which amended this section generally and was approved Nov. 15, 1990.

The Atomic Energy Act, referred to in subsec. (d)(9), probably means the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, act Aug. 1, 1946, ch. 724, as added by act Aug. 30, 1954, ch. 1073, § 1, 68 Stat. 919, which is classified principally to chapter 23 (§ 2011 et seq.) of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 2011 of this title and Tables.

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, referred to in subsecs. (e)(5) and (m)(1)(D), (5)(D), is act June 30, 1948, ch. 758, as amended generally by Puspan. L. 92–500, § 2, Oct. 18, 1972, 86 Stat. 816, which is classified generally to chapter 26 (§ 1251 et seq.) of Title 33, Navigation and Navigable Waters. Title II of the Act is classified generally to subchapter II (§ 1281 et seq.) of chapter 26 of Title 33. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1251 of Title 33 and Tables.

The Toxic Substances Control Act, referred to in subsec. (k)(3)(C), is Puspan. L. 94–469, Oct. 11, 1976, 90 Stat. 2003, as amended, which is classified generally to chapter 53 (§ 2601 et seq.) of Title 15, Commerce and Trade. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 2601 of Title 15 and Tables.

The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, referred to in subsec. (k)(3)(C), probably means the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, act June 25, 1947, ch. 125, as amended generally by Puspan. L. 92–516, Oct. 21, 1972, 86 Stat. 973, which is classified generally to subchapter II (§ 136 et seq.) of chapter 6 of Title 7, Agriculture. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 136 of Title 7 and Tables.

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, referred to in subsec. (k)(3)(C), probably means the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, Puspan. L. 94–580, Oct. 21, 1976, 90 Stat. 2796, as amended, which is classified generally to chapter 82 (§ 6901 et seq.) of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title of 1976 Amendment note set out under section 6901 of this title and Tables.

The Safe Drinking Water Act, referred to in subsec. (m)(1)(D), (5)(D), is title XIV of act July 1, 1944, as added Dec. 16, 1974, Puspan. L. 93–523, § 2(a), 88 Stat. 1660, as amended, which is classified generally to subchapter XII (§ 300f et seq.) of chapter 6A of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 201 of this title and Tables.

The Solid Waste Disposal Act, referred to in subsec. (n)(7), is title II of Puspan. L. 89–272, Oct. 20, 1965, 79 Stat. 997, as amended generally by Puspan. L. 94–580, § 2, Oct. 21, 1976, 90 Stat. 2795. Subtitle C of the Act is classified generally to subchapter III (§ 6921 et seq.) of chapter 82 of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 6901 of this title and Tables.

Section 303 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, referred to in subsec. (o)(4), probably means section 303 of Puspan. L. 101–549, which is set out below.

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, referred to in subsec. (q)(1)–(3), probably means Puspan. L. 101–549, Nov. 15, 1990, 104 Stat. 2399. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 7401 of this title and Tables.

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986, referred to in subsec. (r)(3), is title III of Puspan. L. 99–499, Oct. 17, 1986, 100 Stat. 1728, which is classified generally to chapter 116 (§ 11001 et seq.) of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 11001 of this title and Tables.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act, referred to in subsec. (r)(6)(C)(ii), (K), (L), probably means the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Puspan. L. 91–596, Dec. 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 1590, as amended, which is classified principally to chapter 15 (§ 651 et seq.) of Title 29, Labor. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 651 of Title 29 and Tables.

Codification

In subsec. (r)(6)(N), “section 6101 of title 41” substituted for “section 5 of title 41 of the United States Code” on authority of Puspan. L. 111–350, § 6(c), Jan. 4, 2011, 124 Stat. 3854, which Act enacted Title 41, Public Contracts.

Section was formerly classified to section 1857c–7 of this title.

Amendments

1999—Subsec. (r)(2)(D). Puspan. L. 106–40, § 2(5), added subpar. (D).

Subsec. (r)(4). Puspan. L. 106–40, § 2, substituted “Administrator—

“(A) shall consider—”

for “Administrator shall consider each of the following criteria—” in introductory provisions, redesignated subpars. (A) to (C) as cls. (i) to (iii), respectively, of subpar. (A) and added subpar. (B).

Subsec. (r)(7)(H). Puspan. L. 106–40, § 3(a), added subpar. (H).

1998—Subsec. (n)(2)(C). Puspan. L. 105–362 substituted “On completion of the study, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the results of the study and” for “The Secretary shall prepare annual reports to Congress on the status of the research program and at the completion of the study”.

1991—Subsec. (span)(1). Puspan. L. 102–187 struck out “7783064 Hydrogen sulfide” from list of pollutants.

1990—Puspan. L. 101–549 amended section generally, substituting present provisions for provisions which related to: in subsec. (a), definitions; in subsec. (span), list of hazardous air pollutants, emission standards, and pollution control techniques; in subsec. (c), prohibited acts and exemption; in subsec. (d), State implementation and enforcement; and in subsec. (e), design, equipment, work practice, and operational standards.

1978—Subsec. (e)(5). Puspan. L. 95–623 added par. (5).

1977—Subsec. (a)(1). Puspan. L. 95–95, § 401(c), substituted “causes, or contributes to, air pollution which may reasonably be anticipated to result in an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible, or incapacitating reversible, illness” for “may cause, or contribute to, an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible, or incapacitating reversible, illness”.

Subsec. (d)(1). Puspan. L. 95–95, § 109(d)(2), struck out “(except with respect to stationary sources owned or operated by the United States)” after “implement and enforce such standards”.

Subsec. (e). Puspan. L. 95–95, § 110, added subsec. (e).

Statutory Notes and Related Subsidiaries
Change of Name

Committee on Energy and Commerce of House of Representatives treated as referring to Committee on Commerce of House of Representatives by section 1(a) of Puspan. L. 104–14, set out as a note preceding section 21 of Title 2, The Congress. Committee on Commerce of House of Representatives changed to Committee on Energy and Commerce of House of Representatives, and jurisdiction over matters relating to securities and exchanges and insurance generally transferred to Committee on Financial Services of House of Representatives by House Resolution No. 5, One Hundred Seventh Congress, Jan. 3, 2001.

Effective Date of 1977 Amendment

Amendment by Puspan. L. 95–95 effective Aug. 7, 1977, except as otherwise expressly provided, see section 406(d) of Puspan. L. 95–95, set out as a note under section 7401 of this title.

Termination of Reporting Requirements

For termination, effective May 15, 2000, of provisions of law requiring submittal to Congress of any annual, semiannual, or other regular periodic report listed in House Document No. 103–7 (in which reports required under subsecs. (m)(5), (r)(6)(C)(ii), and (s) of this section are listed, respectively, as the 8th item on page 162, the 9th item on page 198, and the 9th item on page 162), see section 3003 of Puspan. L. 104–66, as amended, set out as a note under section 1113 of Title 31, Money and Finance.

Pending Actions and Proceedings

Suits, actions, and other proceedings lawfully commenced by or against the Administrator or any other officer or employee of the United States in his official capacity or in relation to the discharge of his official duties under act July 14, 1955, the Clean Air Act, as in effect immediately prior to the enactment of Puspan. L. 95–95 [Aug. 7, 1977], not to abate by reason of the taking effect of Puspan. L. 95–95, see section 406(a) of Puspan. L. 95–95, set out as an Effective Date of 1977 Amendment note under section 7401 of this title.

Modification or Rescission of Rules, Regulations, Orders, Determinations, Contracts, Certifications, Authorizations, Delegations, and Other Actions

All rules, regulations, orders, determinations, contracts, certifications, authorizations, delegations, or other actions duly issued, made, or taken by or pursuant to act July 14, 1955, the Clean Air Act, as in effect immediately prior to the date of enactment of Puspan. L. 95–95 [Aug. 7, 1977] to continue in full force and effect until modified or rescinded in accordance with act July 14, 1955, as amended by Puspan. L. 95–95 [this chapter], see section 406(span) of Puspan. L. 95–95, set out as an Effective Date of 1977 Amendment note under section 7401 of this title.

Reports

Puspan. L. 106–40, § 3(span), Aug. 5, 1999, 113 Stat. 213, provided that:

“(1)Definition of accidental release.—In this subsection, the term ‘accidental release’ has the meaning given the term in section 112(r)(2) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7412(r)(2)).
“(2)Report on status of certain amendments.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act [Aug. 5, 1999], the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to Congress a report on the status of the development of amendments to the National Fire Protection Association Code for Liquefied Petroleum Gas that will result in the provision of information to local emergency response personnel concerning the off-site effects of accidental releases of substances exempted from listing under section 112(r)(4)(B) of the Clean Air Act (as added by section 3).
“(3)Report on compliance with certain information submission requirements.—Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to Congress a report that—
“(A) describes the level of compliance with Federal and State requirements relating to the submission to local emergency response personnel of information intended to help the local emergency response personnel respond to chemical accidents or related environmental or public health threats; and
“(B) contains an analysis of the adequacy of the information required to be submitted and the efficacy of the methods for delivering the information to local emergency response personnel.”

Reevaluation of Regulations

Puspan. L. 106–40, § 3(c), Aug. 5, 1999, 113 Stat. 213, provided that: “The President shall reevaluate the regulations promulgated under this section within 6 years after the enactment of this Act [Aug. 5, 1999]. If the President determines not to modify such regulations, the President shall publish a notice in the Federal Register stating that such reevaluation has been completed and that a determination has been made not to modify the regulations. Such notice shall include an explanation of the basis of such decision.”

Public Meeting During Moratorium Period

Puspan. L. 106–40, § 4, Aug. 5, 1999, 113 Stat. 214, provided that:

“(a)In General.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act [Aug. 5, 1999], each owner or operator of a stationary source covered by section 112(r)(7)(B)(ii) of the Clean Air Act [42 U.S.C. 7412(r)(7)(B)(ii)] shall convene a public meeting, after reasonable public notice, in order to describe and discuss the local implications of the risk management plan submitted by the stationary source pursuant to section 112(r)(7)(B)(iii) of the Clean Air Act, including a summary of the off-site consequence analysis portion of the plan. Two or more stationary sources may conduct a joint meeting. In lieu of conducting such a meeting, small business stationary sources as defined in section 507(c)(1) of the Clean Air Act [42 U.S.C. 7661f(c)(1)] may comply with this section by publicly posting a summary of the off-site consequence analysis information for their facility not later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act. Not later than 10 months after the date of enactment of this Act, each such owner or operator shall send a certification to the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation stating that such meeting has been held, or that such summary has been posted, within 1 year prior to, or within 6 months after, the date of the enactment of this Act. This section shall not apply to sources that employ only Program 1 processes within the meaning of regulations promulgated under section 112(r)(7)(B)(i) of the Clean Air Act.
“(span)Enforcement.—The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency may bring an action in the appropriate United States district court against any person who fails or refuses to comply with the requirements of this section, and such court may issue such orders, and take such other actions, as may be necessary to require compliance with such requirements.”

Risk Assessment and Management Commission

Puspan. L. 101–549, title III, § 303, Nov. 15, 1990, 104 Stat. 2574, provided that:

“(a)Establishment.—There is hereby established a Risk Assessment and Management Commission (hereafter referred to in this section as the ‘Commission’), which shall commence proceedings not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 [Nov. 15, 1990] and which shall make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic human health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances.
“(span)Charge.—The Commission shall consider—
“(1) the report of the National Academy of Sciences authorized by section 112(o) of the Clean Air Act [42 U.S.C. 7412(o)], the use and limitations of risk assessment in establishing emission or effluent standards, ambient standards, exposure standards, acceptable concentration levels, tolerances or other environmental criteria for hazardous substances that present a risk of carcinogenic effects or other chronic health effects and the suitability of risk assessment for such purposes;
“(2) the most appropriate methods for measuring and describing cancer risks or risks of other chronic health effects from exposure to hazardous substances considering such alternative approaches as the lifetime risk of cancer or other effects to the individual or individuals most exposed to emissions from a source or sources on both an actual and worst case basis, the range of such risks, the total number of health effects avoided by exposure reductions, effluent standards, ambient standards, exposures standards, acceptable concentration levels, tolerances and other environmental criteria, reductions in the number of persons exposed at various levels of risk, the incidence of cancer, and other public health factors;
“(3) methods to reflect uncertainties in measurement and estimation techniques, the existence of synergistic or antagonistic effects among hazardous substances, the accuracy of extrapolating human health risks from animal exposure data, and the existence of unquantified direct or indirect effects on human health in risk assessment studies;
“(4) risk management policy issues including the use of lifetime cancer risks to individuals most exposed, incidence of cancer, the cost and technical feasibility of exposure reduction measures and the use of site-specific actual exposure information in setting emissions standards and other limitations applicable to sources of exposure to hazardous substances; and
“(5) and comment on the degree to which it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology, or a consistent standard of acceptable risk, among various Federal programs.
“(c)Membership.—Such Commission shall be composed of ten members who shall have knowledge or experience in fields of risk assessment or risk management, including three members to be appointed by the President, two members to be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, one member to be appointed by the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives, two members to be appointed by the Majority Leader of the Senate, one member to be appointed by the Minority Leader of the Senate, and one member to be appointed by the President of the National Academy of Sciences. Appointments shall be made not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 [Nov. 15, 1990].
“(d)Assistance from Agencies.—The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and the heads of all other departments, agencies, and instrumentalities of the executive branch of the Federal Government shall, to the maximum extent practicable, assist the Commission in gathering such information as the Commission deems necessary to carry out this section subject to other provisions of law.
“(e)Staff and Contracts.—
“(1) In the conduct of the study required by this section, the Commission is authorized to contract (in accordance with Federal contract law) with nongovernmental entities that are competent to perform research or investigations within the Commission’s mandate, and to hold public hearings, forums, and workshops to enable full public participation.
“(2) The Commission may appoint and fix the pay of such staff as it deems necessary in accordance with the provisions of title 5, United States Code. The Commission may request the temporary assignment of personnel from the Environmental Protection Agency or other Federal agencies.
“(3) The members of the Commission who are not officers or employees of the United States, while attending conferences or meetings of the Commission or while otherwise serving at the request of the Chair, shall be entitled to receive compensation at a rate not in excess of the maximum rate of pay for Grade GS–18, as provided in the General Schedule under section 5332 of title 5 of the United States Code, including travel time, and while away from their homes or regular places of business they may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence as authorized by law for persons in the Government service employed intermittently.
“(f)Report.—A report containing the results of all Commission studies and investigations under this section, together with any appropriate legislative recommendations or administrative recommendations, shall be made available to the public for comment not later than 42 months after the date of enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 [Nov. 15, 1990] and shall be submitted to the President and to the Congress not later than 48 months after such date of enactment. In the report, the Commission shall make recommendations with respect to the appropriate use of risk assessment and risk management in Federal regulatory programs to prevent cancer or other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. The Commission shall cease to exist upon the date determined by the Commission, but not later than 9 months after the submission of such report.
“(g)Authorization.—There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as are necessary to carry out the activities of the Commission established by this section.”

[References in laws to the rates of pay for GS–16, 17, or 18, or to maximum rates of pay under the General Schedule, to be considered references to rates payable under specified sections of Title 5, Government Organization and Employees, see section 529 [title I, § 101(c)(1)] of Puspan. L. 101–509, set out in a note under section 5376 of Title 5.]

Executive Documents
Delegation of Authority

Memorandum of President of the United States, Aug. 19, 1993, 58 F.R. 52397, provided:

Memorandum for the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

WHEREAS, the Environmental Protection Agency, the agencies and departments that are members of the National Response Team (authorized under Executive Order No. 12580, 52 Fed. Reg. 2923 (1987) [42 U.S.C. 9615 note]), and other Federal agencies and departments undertake emergency release prevention, mitigation, and response activities pursuant to various authorities;

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including section 112(r)(10) of the Clean Air Act (the “Act”) (section 7412(r)(10) of title 42 of the United States Code) and section 301 of title 3 of the United States Code, and in order to provide for the delegation of certain functions under the Act [42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.], I hereby:

(1) Authorize you, in coordination with agencies and departments that are members of the National Response Team and other appropriate agencies and departments, to conduct a review of release prevention, mitigation, and response authorities of Federal agencies in order to assure the most effective and efficient implementation of such authorities and to identify any deficiencies in authority or resources that may exist, to the extent such review is required by section 112(r)(10) of the Act; and

(2) Authorize you, in coordination with agencies and departments that are members of the National Response Team and other appropriate agencies and departments, to prepare and transmit a message to the Congress concerning the release prevention, mitigation, and response activities of the Federal Government with such recommendations for change in law as you deem appropriate, to the extent such message is required by section 112(r)(10) of the Act.

The authority delegated by this memorandum may be further redelegated within the Environmental Protection Agency.

You are hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.

William J. Clinton.

Memorandum of President of the United States, Jan. 27, 2000, 65 F.R. 8631, provided:

Memorandum for the Attorney General[, ] the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency[, and] the Director of the Office of Management and Budget

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including section 112(r)(7)(H) of the Clean Air Act (“Act”) (42 U.S.C. 7412(r)(7)(H)), as added by section 3 of the Chemical Safety Information, Site Security and Fuels Regulatory Relief Act (Public Law 106–40), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, I hereby delegate to:

(1) the Attorney General the authority vested in the President under section 112(r)(7)(H)(ii)(I)(aa) of the Act to assess the increased risk of terrorist and other criminal activity associated with the posting of off-site consequence analysis information on the Internet;

(2) the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority vested in the President under section 112(r)(7)(H)(ii)(I)(bspan) of the Act to assess the incentives created by public disclosure of off-site consequence analysis information for reduction in the risk of accidental releases; and

(3) the Attorney General and the Administrator of EPA, jointly, the authority vested in the President under section 112(r)(7)(H)(ii)(II) of the Act to promulgate regulations, based on these assessments, governing the distribution of off-site consequence analysis information. These regulations, in proposed and final form, shall be subject to review and approval by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

The Administrator of EPA is authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.

William J. Clinton.
Flexible Implementation of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Rule

Memorandum of President of the United States, Dec. 21, 2011, 76 F.R. 80727, provided:

Memorandum for the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

Today’s issuance, by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), of the final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule for power plants (the “MATS Rule”) represents a major step forward in my Administration’s efforts to protect public health and the environment.

This rule, issued after careful consideration of public comments, prescribes standards under section 112 of the Clean Air Act to control emissions of mercury and other toxic air pollutants from power plants, which collectively are among the largest sources of such pollution in the United States. The EPA estimates that by substantially reducing emissions of pollutants that contribute to neurological damage, cancer, respiratory illnesses, and other health risks, the MATS Rule will produce major health benefits for millions of Americans—including children, older Americans, and other vulnerable populations. Consistent with Executive Order 13563 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review), the estimated benefits of the MATS Rule far exceed the estimated costs.

The MATS Rule can be implemented through the use of demonstrated, existing pollution control technologies. The United States is a global market leader in the design and manufacture of these technologies, and it is anticipated that U.S. firms and workers will provide much of the equipment and labor needed to meet the substantial investments in pollution control that the standards are expected to spur.

These new standards will promote the transition to a cleaner and more efficient U.S. electric power system. This system as a whole is critical infrastructure that plays a key role in the functioning of all facets of the U.S. economy, and maintaining its stability and reliability is of critical importance. It is therefore crucial that implementation of the MATS Rule proceed in a cost-effective manner that ensures electric reliability.

Analyses conducted by the EPA and the Department of Energy (DOE) indicate that the MATS Rule is not anticipated to compromise electric generating resource adequacy in any region of the country. The Clean Air Act offers a number of implementation flexibilities, and the EPA has a long and successful history of using those flexibilities to ensure a smooth transition to cleaner technologies.

The Clean Air Act provides 3 years from the effective date of the MATS Rule for sources to comply with its requirements. In addition, section 112(i)(3)(B) of the Act allows the issuance of a permit granting a source up to one additional year where necessary for the installation of controls. As you stated in the preamble to the MATS Rule, this additional fourth year should be broadly available to sources, consistent with the requirements of the law.

The EPA has concluded that 4 years should generally be sufficient to install the necessary emission control equipment, and DOE has issued analysis consistent with that conclusion. While more time is generally not expected to be needed, the Clean Air Act offers other important flexibilities as well. For example, section 113(a) of the Act provides the EPA with flexibility to bring sources into compliance over the course of an additional year, should unusual circumstances arise that warrant such flexibility.

To address any concerns with respect to electric reliability while assuring MATS’ public health benefits, I direct you to take the following actions:

1. Building on the information and guidance that you have provided to the public, relevant stakeholders, and permitting authorities in the preamble of the MATS Rule, work with State and local permitting authorities to make the additional year for compliance with the MATS Rule provided under section 112(i)(3)(B) of the Clean Air Act broadly available to sources, consistent with law, and to invoke this flexibility expeditiously where justified.

2. Promote early, coordinated, and orderly planning and execution of the measures needed to implement the MATS Rule while maintaining the reliability of the electric power system. Consistent with Executive Order 13563, this process should be designed to “promote predictability and reduce uncertainty,” and should include engagement and coordination with DOE, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, State utility regulators, Regional Transmission Organizations, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation and regional electric reliability organizations, other grid planning authorities, electric utilities, and other stakeholders, as appropriate.

3. Make available to the public, including relevant stakeholders, information concerning any anticipated use of authorities: (a) under section 112(i)(3)(B) of the Clean Air Act in the event that additional time to comply with the MATS Rule is necessary for the installation of technology; and (span) under section 113(a) of the Clean Air Act in the event that additional time to comply with the MATS Rule is necessary to address a specific and documented electric reliability issue. This information should describe the process for working with entities with relevant expertise to identify circumstances where electric reliability concerns might justify allowing additional time to comply.

This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

You are hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.

Barack Obama.